Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – ABC’s Motive

After my second DVR crash since March, I found myself scurrying around, trying to recover the 200+ recordings I lost.  Amongst those so inconveniently deleted was ABC’s new police procedural, Motive

Unfortunately, I missed the pilot.  When I was finally ready to sit down and enjoy a Motive marathon, I couldn’t find the first episode—not online, not via OnDemand, not anywhere.  Thanks a lot U-verse.  I did have the pilot recorded… but anyway.  I have a better DVR now with a larger hard drive, so I can’t complain too much.

Notice I said too much.  I’m still having trouble finding episodes I lost (the King & Maxwell pilot, the Under the Dome pilot, etc) and I hate starting series without that first crucial hour of television to know whether or not they’ve hooked me.

So, for now, I’m stuck doing the best I can and starting with the second episodes…. which is exactly what I did with Motive.

Any time a crime occurs, whether in real life or on TV, everyone wants to know why the crime was committed in the first place—the motive.

Television is full of crime dramas and police procedurals today, but most of these shows focus on the investigation and capture of the suspects rather than the motive behind the act.  Some TV programs might answer the “why” in a brief one or two lines of dialogue after they’ve interrogated the suspect for a few minutes, but they don’t really spend a lot of time on the motive.

Motive, a new ABC crime drama, hopes to change all of that.

The new series follows Detective Angie Flynn (Kristin Lehman, Judging Amy and The Killing) and her partner (Louis Ferreira, SGU Stargate Universe) as they work homicide cases.

Detectives Flynn and Vega

Wait a minute… that sounds just like every other police procedural on TV today.  Right?

Wrong.  Motive will identify the killer and victim at the beginning of each episode.  Before we even see the crime scene!  Now that’s unique…

For the most part, Motive is like all the other police procedurals out there… the detectives inherit a case and work the scene from the ground up, looking primarily for the “who” and the “why.”  But with ABC’s new drama, viewers get to see the “who” and “why” before anything else.  The show flashes back throughout the entire hour, telling us the stories of both the killer and the victim, and very little about the detectives and their personal lives.

That’s right.  Motive is more about the crimes than it is the stars of the show.  Having missed the pilot, I wasn’t even aware that Flynn was a single mother until about the fourth episode.  And even then, the series barely touches on that relationship… but there’s enough to give the no-nonsense detective a heart (I’m not saying she’s callous, it’s just that she’s not on the job to make friends).

So far, Detective Flynn is a closer…

Anyway…

Motive kind of reminds me of a combination of Cold Case (because of the series of flashbacks) and the short-lived series The Whole Truth, where viewers experienced the crime through both the prosecutor’s and the defense attorney’s point of view and they had to decide which one was the truth… fun show, but it didn’t last long.  I believe we’ve already seen more episodes of Motive than The Whole Truth, so that can be promising for ABC’s new police procedural.

And by the way, the new crime drama also stars: Lauren Holly (NCIS) as Betty Rogers, the medical examiner; Roger Cross (24) as Supervisor Boyd Bloom; Brendan Penny (Stargate: Atlantis) as rookie detective Brian Lucas; and Cameron Bright (The Twilight Saga) as Manny Flynn, Angela’s son.

Bottom line?  Motive is different enough from the other police procedurals on TV.  I’ll give it at least that.  But do I like it more than all the others?  Not really.  I will say this though… it is nice that the series actually focuses more on the crime (and the killer and victim) than the cops themselves.  For that, ABC’s new drama scores the JFTV ratingRay Donovan gets the summer’s top nod with a GTV rating, and ABC’s Mistresses gets an upgrade since my last review to my MacTV/guilty pleasure of the summer…

Dr. Rogers is a small role for Lauren Holly, but it’s nice to see her back on TV.

But I like Motive.  And I’m all caught up… and I caught up through the seven episodes in only four days.  However, watching police procedurals is like standing on the chip aisle at the local grocery.  There are so many different brands and flavors to choose from, each bag with its own unique twist, that we only have time to grab a few here and there each time or our grocery basket would be nothing but chips.

Have you watched Motive?  Do you plan to?  What do you think of the show’s format, showing us the killer and the victim in the first few minutes?  I’d love to hear from you!

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – Showtime’s Ray Donovan

Dexter has been a staple for Showtime for the past eight seasons.  And after years of success, the series is finally calling it quits.  So what will Showtime do now?

Enter Ray Donovan

I’ve been watching the trailers and advertisements for Ray Donovan for months.  And I was instantly interested.  Why?  Because the title character looks like a dark role and it’s played by a man who always make me swoon—Liev Schreiber.  Maybe it’s his sexy and deep voice?  Anyway, the teasers did their job and I had been eagerly awaiting Showtime’s latest original series’ premiere for what felt like forever.

Ray Donovan is my favorite new summer show at the moment, mainly because Liev Schreiber is hot.  And not just in the physical attraction kind of way…

Ray is a family man; he’s a successful business man (he’s a Hollywood “fixer”); he’s a man of few words; and most importantly, he’s not one to cross.  Seriously, hurt his family (either physically or verbally), and just see what happens.  This new Showtime series reminds me a lot of Scandal… meets The Sopranos (RIP, Mr. Gandolfini).

Ray Donovan (played by the adorable Liev Schreiber, from the Scream films, Salt, and other major motion pictures) “fixes” Hollywood’s problems.  He does the dirty work for the city’s celebrities and life seems great for Ray… until his father (Mickey Donovan, played by the great Jon Voight—no introduction necessary, right?) is released from prison.

Father and son don’t really care for each other very much…

Speaking of Ray’s father… Mickey spent twenty years in prison and blames Ray (and Ray’s colleagues) for putting him there.  Upon his release, he immediately kills a priest (the series will explain why… don’t worry) and heads out to California to see his sons.  Jon Voight’s performance is perfect.  And creepy.  I’m not quite sure anyone else could have portrayed Mickey any better in this role.

The new Showtime series also stars: Paula Malcomson (Deadwood) as Abby Donovan, Ray’s wife and L.A. social climber—I’m not so sure I like her. She’s very spiteful and spoiled… but Ray does love her; Steven Bauer (Scarface) as Avi, Ray’s right-hand man; Katherine Moenning (The L Word) as Lena, Ray’s assistant; Pooch Hall (Jumping the Broom) as Daryll, Ray’s half brother, who was kept a secret from Ray for over twenty years… because his mother was Mickey’s mistress before going away to prison; Dash Mihok (Romeo + Juliet) as Bunchy Donovan, Ray’s very troubled brother—very troubled brother.  Bunch is the victim of molestation by a priest and is the recent recipient of a $1 million settlement; Eddie Marsan (Mission: Impossible III) as Terry Donovan, Ray’s other brother, who suffers from Parkinson’s due to boxing… and I’m assuming because of this, he seems to think nothing good can go his way; Elliot Gould (Friends and the Ocean’s movies) as Ezra, a frequent client of Ray’s/Ray’s boss; and Peter Jacobson (House) as Lee Drexler, Ezra’s partner and Ray’s “other” boss… the bossy one.

So much happens in the pilot.  In the first fifty or so minutes, not only do we meet the entire Ray Donovan clan, but we also see just what Ray does and why he’s so good at it.

Oh that stare… that sexy, angry stare.

First, one client (a basketball star) wakes up next to a dead woman… she overdosed in bed.  So, he calls Ray.  Ray “fixes” it by sneaking in another client, who needs a quick PR fix (he’s supposed to be a hot Hollywood stud, but his homosexuality is holding him back… and the media is fixated on following him right now).  The basketball star is in the clear; the actor gets negative press that he turns into a positive for his career; and everybody wins.

As if that wasn’t enough work for one day, Ray is also hired to surveil another Hollywood big wig’s mistress.  Turns out, she is being stalked.  Ray tracks down the obsessed fan and offers him a choice—the bag or the bat.  Let’s just say it would have saved Ray time to just offer up the bat in the first place.

Bottom line, Ray is no joke.  Do not mess with Ray or his family.  Do not stand in Ray’s way of “fixing” his clients’ problems.  He may be the strong, silent type, but he means what he says and he says what he means—no sugarcoating.  Liev Schreiber’s performance is hot.  I’ll say it again.  Ray appears to keep his calm, even when is temper gets the best of him.  It’s pretty sexy.  Plus, Ray has a heart of gold and is extremely generous… when generosity is due.

Ray Donovan is an intense hour of television.  And it should come as no surprise to anyone after reading this review that I am awarding Showtime’s hot new series with the GTV rating. I highly recommend watching Ray with a steak grilled to order, baked potato, steamed veggies, and a glass of fine wine.  Or whiskey.  Straight up.  It’s that delicious.

Ray totally joins the rankings of Raylan Givens and Michael Westen in my book… hot and sexy with a whole lot of badassery.

Oh, and the show supposedly smashed all the previous records for Showtime premieres. 

Have you watched Ray Donovan?  Do you plan to?  What do you think of the new Showtime series?  I’d love to hear from you!

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – ABC’s Mistresses

The summer shows have started, some of them anyway.  And while we still have at least one left to premiere, and despite my second DVR crash since March (I’ve lost over 200 recordings this calendar year due to faulty boxes), I did manage to catch up on the first half of the new ABC drama, Mistresses.

Based on the popular British television series of the same name, Mistresses is a sexy new drama following the lives of four girlfriends as they discover who they really are via their friendships, relationships, and sex.

Sound familiar?  I’m thinking of one of my favorites here… Sex and the City.

The series stars: Alyssa Milano (Charmed) as Savannah “Savi” Davis, a successful lawyer, married and trying to have a baby… that is until she and her husband learn they have fertility issues; Jes Macallan as Josslyn Carver, Savi’s single and carefree younger sister, who is not looking to settle down anytime soon; Rochelle Aytes (Detroit 1-8-7 and The Forgotten) as April Malloy, a recent widow and single mother, who owns her own shop; and Junjin Kim (Lost) as Karen Kim, a successful therapist, who had an affair with one of her patients.

The pilot begins with hot and steamy sex… for network TV… as did the second episode as well.  Viewers watch Savi and her husband “role playing” during their attempts to make a baby.  We also meet Joss while she’s having a little “afternoon delight” with her then boss.  And let’s not forget about the flashback sex scenes between Karen and her patient.  April might just be the only one who’s not sweating between the sheets at the moment (or at least through episode four because that’s how far into the series I am).

They’re all beautiful; they’re all successful; and they’ve all got issues.  Serious issues.

Savi has every reason to be freaking out right now…

When Savi and her husband (Harry, played by Brett Davis from the popular Australian series McLeod’s Daughters and Neighbours) learn of their fertility issues, he pushes her away as he blames and punishes himself for having abnormal sperm.  This catapults Savi into the arms of her coworker (Dominick, played by Jason George from Sunset Beach and Grey’s Anatomy) and they have one night of hot, steamy sex.  And guess what?  She’s pregnant…

Karen and her lover/patient

Meanwhile, as if sleeping with her dying (now dead) patient wasn’t a big enough issue for Karen, the patient’s family just can’t seem to stop themselves from leaning on her.  His wife (Penelope Ann Miller from Kindergarten Cop) doesn’t appear to have a clue about the affair, but his son (Sam, played by Erik Stocklin) knows there was another woman and he wants answers… from Karen.

April’s shock at the news of her husband’s infidelity…

Then there’s April… poor April.  She’s having a hard time letting go of her dead husband, so much so that she believes that a few recent prank calls she has received are actually his ghost telling her to not move on.  But it turns out those calls aren’t from her husband, they are from her husband’s mistress and their illegitimate son.  As if that’s not enough to deal with, the woman wants money… after all, her son is entitled to some of the inheritance April’s daughter received from the insurance company.

Joss… ready to turn on the charm. But will it work?

And last but not least, we have Joss… we discover early on that she has climbed her way to the top of her realty company by sleeping with her boss.  But he’s gone now and her new boss isn’t falling for any of her tricks.  She has to actually work now and sell a few properties before he’ll let her have all of her listings back.  Work doesn’t seem to be what she’s best at, thus the fact she’s technically homeless and living in Savi’s guest house right now (I can’t remember the details, but she slept with her landlord too).

Now let’s talk about the title for a minute.

According to Webster, a mistress is a woman who is the head of a household, country, or state… or a woman with whom a man is having a prolonged affair with.

Let’s focus on the latter.

Not only do I watch a lot of television programs, but I also enjoy a good talk show here and there.  Especially when the guests are stars I like.  Alyssa Milano has stated in at least two TV interviews that I have seen that the girls, her character included, are not all mistresses.  Not by the definition we are most familiar with anyway.  She included the show is in no way glorifying mistresses or situations that tend to break up marriages and relationships… (even if it does seem to us, the TV audience, that each woman is connected to a traditional mistress in one way or another—it’s true; I know people who have already stopped watching the program for this very reason).

Ms. Milano also stated in an interview that while this program is based on the BBC series, the writers took an entire season of the British version and wrapped up the storyline in one episode… I’m assuming that was the pilot… and that this series is all its own.

I went into Mistresses not expecting to like it.  For one, I’m a big Sex and the City fan and initially felt this series was trying to cash in on Carrie’s and the girls’ success.  But because I’m an Alyssa Milano fan (I watched Who’s the Boss? as a little girl and LOVED Charmed more than words can say), I knew I’d give it a shot.

And it’s turning into a guilty pleasure…

Bottom line?  I give Mistresses the JFTV rating.  It’s definitely not good for us, but I couldn’t stop at just one episode.

Oh, and I’m glad I didn’t stop with the pilot because Gary Dourdan guest starred in the second episode.  Remember Warrick Brown from CSI: Crime Scene Investigation?  Uh, I’ve missed those blues eyes… I hope he comes back for more!

And then in episode three, I see a Twitter friend.  That’s right; a Twitter friend.  Matthew Del Negro may guest on some of the hottest shows on television (love his recurring character on Rizzoli & Isles), but he’s also a very nice guy and I enjoy chatting with him on occasion via the Twitterverse.  I hope to see more of him too!

So, it seems I will keep watching Mistresses

Have you watched Mistresses?  Do you plan to?  Will Mistresses be the next Sex and the City?  Or will it flop trying, just like Lipstick Jungle?  I’d love to hear from you!

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – Fictional Reality in Siberia

The summer shows have started, some of them anyway.  And while we still have a few left to premiere, and despite my second DVR crash since March (I’ve lost over 200 recordings this calendar year due to faulty boxes), I did manage to catch up on the new NBC fictional reality program, Siberia.

Fictional Reality.  Now that’s an oxymoron.

Siberia has also been called a “scripted reality” TV show.  Either way, this series is not real and it might as well be called a drama like everything else on television today.  Only this series doesn’t have any recognizable actors or actresses.

My confusion with this series started before the pilot episode aired.  It all began when I saw a commercial less than one week before its premiere.  Why hadn’t I heard anything about this before?  Great promotion, NBC…  Then after watching the teaser, I had to rewind the commercial a few times and watch it over and over.  Was Siberia a reality show?  No, it kind of looked like a scripted drama with people running for their lives and dying with Blair Witch-like cinematography.  In other words, my cup of tea!  So then I did what I always do, I scanned through my TV guide and found the listing.  But from the description, Siberia totally sounded like a reality program.  At this point, I set the series to record.  I mean, why not?  Clearly the confusion had me intrigued…

So what was Siberia?  A scripted drama?  A reality program?  I’ll tell you what it was.  A mess.  That’s what.

It started out like any other reality competition…

Sixteen contestants are dropped in the Siberian forest.  Their goal?  Survive the wilderness for half a million dollars.  Everything at this point seems like a typical reality show.  The participants were given their first challenge—find the cabins they would live in throughout the duration of the contest.  The last two to arrive would be eliminated.

Sounds like a normal reality show, right?

But then everything changes.

When does everything go south?  Well, for one, when a cameraman comes back to camp with a mysterious injury.  Oh, and when the host arrives to announce one of the contestants was involved in a fatal accident—that’s right; a player is dead.

WHAT??

It gets better (or worse…).

At this point in the game, the host then decides to give the remaining players a choice—to continue (yeah, right; if someone really died in a mysterious manner, I doubt production would go on….) or quit and walk away with $5,000 cash on the spot.  Only one contestant left and took the money.

Someone just died… do I play on or quit now? Decisions, decisions.

Within minutes, the game carries on like nothing ever happened.  A few players are even concerned with having sex with the other contestants at this point… not with the fact that someone just supposedly died.

Now, I like reality TV.  I love Survivor, Big Brother, MTV’s The Challenges, and Hell’s Kitchen.  Don’t get me wrong; I realize that not everything is really real on “reality” TV.  Trust me; it’s not.  I know this for a fact.  I’ve had a friend, two actually, that appeared on a reality TV show and last through several rounds.  And while the events we see do actually happen, editing is king.  Viewers see what production wants us to see.  TV audiences at home feel about certain contestants the way production wants us to.  Period.

But this?  Siberia?  Yikes.

Bottom line?  I don’t know why I’m still watching Siberia.  Maybe it’s because I’m a glutton for punishment and I have a hard time quitting things?  Even TV shows…  Therefore, this new “reality” program earns the LOTV rating.  Blech doesn’t even begin to describe it.  Yet, I will probably still watch a few more episodes to see if it gets any better.

Have you watched Siberia?  Do you plan to?  Is “reality” TV going too far?  I’d love to hear from you!

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – Whodunnit?

The summer shows have started, some of them anyway.  And while we still have a few left to premiere, and despite my second DVR crash since March (I’ve lost over 200 recordings this calendar year due to faulty boxes), I did manage to catch up on the new ABC reality program/murder mystery, Whodunnit? via OnDemand.

Ever want to attend one of those murder mystery dinner parties or theaters?  I have!

Whodunnit? is kind of like reality television’s version of these parties…

Thirteen contestants have gathered to live inside a mansion (Rue Manor).  Their goal?  Solve a “murder” for the grand prize of $250,000.  Each week, one houseguest is selected to “die” a mysterious death by the “killer,” who also happens to be one of the houseguests.  But who is it?

At the time of the murder, the remaining guests become “investigators.”  Led around by the butler, Giles, and two housemaids, they must immediately choose one of three options: to visit the scene of the victim’s last known whereabouts, the scene of the crime, or the morgue (located in the basement of the mansion).  The “investigators” then use their investigative skills to work up a “murder dossier” of sorts.

Let’s talk about the “investigators” for a minute…  talk about clashing personalities!  Most of the contestants should really know what they are doing, being their professions, in one way or another, are crime related (a former homicide detective, a bounty hunter, a few attorneys, an insurance investigator, and two journalists—one of whom is a TV crime reporter).  The rest of the houseguests fall into the “everybody else” category, with an ex-beauty queen, a cardiac nurse, a bar trivia host, an engineer, a flight attendant, and an ex-NFL cheerleader.

This is an eclectic group of people and this fact creates quite a few challenges of its own.  For example, pretty much everyone uses different investigative techniques and skills and has different ways of “dealing” with others.  But the biggest challenge between the members of the game is whether or not they can trust the other participants… do they share what they’ve learned or keep everything a secret?  To quote Melina (the flight attendant), “this group is a hot mess.”

Considering this is reality TV, the actual death scenes aren’t too corny and the stunts and special effects aren’t all that bad.  So far, we’ve seen a death by a musket round fired via a sling shot, covered up by the careful planning of the “killer” to make it look like electrocution at first glance, and a death by fire via static electricity.

As far as the game is concerned, the contestants also receive one clue/riddle per murder.  Once the riddle is solved, a bell sounds and the game is “dead.”  After getting dressed up for a potential last meal, the “investigators” describe in detail what they think happened and those furthest from the truth are eliminated.  One by one, and in front of each other, they learn whether or not their theories earned them a “spared” card or a “scared” card—meaning who’s safe and who’s potentially going to “die” later that night.

When I previewed this show last month, I commented that this setup reminded me of the older reality show, The Mole, that aired from 2001-2008.  Remember that one?

After watching the first two episodes, I’ve concluded that Whodunnit? is very much like The Mole.  For one, instead of working together to earn money each week, this group of untrusting souls should work together to figure out who “the killer” is to further advance themselves in the game.  Secondly, the way the “investigators” reveal what they think happened is similar, making their pitch privately to a camera.  Even the way the houseguests are informed whether or not they are safe is the same (from what I can remember from The Mole anyway… it’s been awhile since I’ve watched it).  And lastly, just like “The Mole,” “the killer” is doing everything in his or her power to throw the rest of the houseguests off his/her trail by sabotaging the game.

Bottom line?  I’m hooked… earning Whodunnit? the MacTV rating for this mystery writer.  TV’s latest reality program is a total guilty pleasure.  And so far, it has me completely stumped.  The person I thought was “the killer” was “murdered” at the end of the second episode.  Drats!  Back to the drawing board…

Have you watched Whodunnit?  Do you plan to?  I’d love to hear from you!

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – Devious Maids, Devilishly Fun

The summer shows have started, some of them anyway.  And while we still have quite a few to premiere over the next few weeks, I did catch a new Lifetime original series that aired this past weekend: Devious Maids.

I almost missed this new series…  I hadn’t heard anything about it.  Luckily, as I watched the Lifetime original Jodi Arias story, I caught a commercial for Devious Maids just in time to set my DVR for the premiere.

The story begins with a wealthy wife confronting her husband and their maid for having an affair.  Having said her piece, the wife takes her husband back down to their lavish backyard party… while someone murders the maid upstairs.

A murder mystery.  Already, I’m intrigued.

Devious Maids follows a group of beautiful Hispanic housekeepers in Beverly Hills and the rich families they work for.  First, there’s Marisol (played by Ana Ortiz from Ugly Betty).  She’s new to the scene, but has a very good reason for being there…  Then there’s Rosie (J. Dania Ramirez from Heroes and Entourage).  She’s the sweet one, working diligently to bring her young son to America from Mexico.  Next, there’s Carmen (played by the beautiful Roselyn Sanchez from Without a Trace).  Carmen landed a maid-ship, working for a Latin recording artist… a lucky coincidence, since she has her own dreams and aspirations of signing a big record deal.  And finally there’s Zoila (Judy Reyes from Scrubs) and Valentina (Edy Ganem), a mother and daughter cleaning team… that is if the mother can remind the daughter that she’s there to dust and mop (and that the rich folk don’t date the help).

After watching the first hour, this new Lifetime original series reminded me of Desperate Housewives.  There are hot guys (Drew Van Acker—also known as Jason DiLaurentis from Pretty Little Liars, and  Matt Cedeno—Brandon Walker from Days of our Lives);  familiar faces (Susan Lucci—the Erica Kane from All My Children, Grant Show—from the “real” Melrose Place, Brett Cullen—Harold’s business partner from Person of Interest, Mariana Klaveno—Lorena from True Blood; Rebecca Wisocky—the seemingly untrustworthy Brenda from The Mentalist, Brianna Brown—the crazy Lisa from General Hospital; and Tom Irwin—from one of my old favorites… My So Called Life); plus, gossip, lust, and humor, with both laugh-out-loud moments and backhanded comments.

“You thought my maid had plastic surgery?” ~Taylor
“Poor people like to be pretty too!” ~Evelyn

Oh, and did I mention Devious Maids was created by Marc Cherry?  You know, the man responsible for Desperate Housewives?  No wonder I saw the similarities… even the music reminded me of our favorite ladies from Wisteria Lane.

I’ll admit; when I first saw the commercials for the new series, I rolled my eyes.  Just a little bit.  But you know me; I set my DVR to record it anyway.  And I’m really kind of glad I did… because Devious Maids is devilishly fun.

So for now, I’m awarding Devious Maids with the JFTV rating.  This dramedy is definitely a guilty pleasure.  And if you miss Desperate Housewives, this one might be just for you!

Did you watch Devious Maids?  Do you plan to?  I’d love to hear from you!

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – Longmire, a Cozy Murder Mystery

We may have started a new trend here last week… I hope so at least.  Anyway, today we have our second Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday guest blogger!

Author Steven Montano
Author Steven Montano

The Ooo Factor readers may remember today’s guest, Steven Montano, from one of our earlier author features.  Steven is really a machine, truth be told.  He has written six stories in his post-apocalyptic series, Blood Skies, as well as the novella, Something Black.  Not only that, but he’s a full-time accountant!  See?  A machine…  He’s married with two beautiful children, loves spending time outdoors (he lives in Washington State so he can afford to spend time outside, unlike those of us in Texas where it’s already in the triple digits), and he takes magnificent photographs.

Photo courtesy of Steven Montano
Photo courtesy of Steven Montano

Anywho…

I’ve had a lot on my plate lately (like running away to Vegas and getting married!!), and instead of reblogging an older post today, I asked Steven to step in.  I’ve heard a lot of good things about today’s TV show, and when Steven messaged me asking when I was going to review it, I shamefully admitted I hadn’t seen it and left an open invitation for him to write a review for us.  His guest post couldn’t have come at a better time.  So, what does he think about A&E’s original series, Longmire?

Let’s find out!

*****

Whoa. A guest post.  And one completely out of my element, because this week I’m reviewing the A&E TV Series Longmire.

First off, about me: I’m the author of the dystopian military sci-fi Blood Skies novels and the upcoming epic fantasy City of Scars.  And while my being an Indie author in no way qualifies me to write a review of a television series, it’s worth noting that my wife Liberty and I have become quite the TV connoisseurs in the past few years, eating up everything from police procedurals to murder mysteries to wacky comedies to gritty fantasy.  It’s difficult to say which television genre is our favorite, but the “cozy murder mystery” ranks right up there…and that brings us to Longmire, based on the popular novels by Craig Johnson.

Longmire follows the title character, Sheriff Walt Longmire (Robert Taylor), as he returns to work following the death of his wife to protect the people of remote Absaroka County, Wyoming.  Aided by a diverse and eclectic group of deputies and his barkeep best friend, Walt investigates oft-times brutal crimes while contending with racial tensions between the white residents and the local Cheyenne reservation, as well as the pressures of potentially not being re-elected as Sheriff.

Longmire also stars Katee Sackhoff (Battlestar: Galactica) as Vic, a deputy recently relocated from Philadelphia; Lou Diamond Phillips (Young Guns) as Henry Standing Bear, Walt’s best friend and the proprietor of the Red Pony Café; Cassidy Freeman (Smallville) as Cady, Walt’s lawyer daughter; Bailey Chase (Saving Grace) as Branch, a fiery deputy running against Walt for the Sheriff’s office; and Adam Bartley as Deputy Ferguson (aka “The Ferg”), a somewhat bungling member of Walt’s team hired as a favor to his father.

Though Longmire is listed as a “crime drama,” for me it falls under what I like to call “cozy murder mystery”: a whodunit featuring lots of familiar elements, engaging characters, and just enough humor and surprises to keep you wanting to come back for more.  While the name “cozy murder mystery” may call to mind shows like Murder, She Wrote or Matlock, there are plenty of modern equivalents that fill the same criteria, from Castle and Elementary to Bones and Rizzoli & Isles.  With all of these shows, figuring out the crime really takes something of a backseat to watching the characters work off of one another and struggle against their situations and environment, and even if you can guess who the killer is in the first 15 minutes (which is usually the case with all of the afore-mentioned shows), watching our intrepid heroes figure it all out is often the most engaging element.

Longmire takes the familiar elements of these shows – the mysterious killing, the red herrings, the ever-growing list of suspects and last-minute revelations – and adds a new twist: rather than being located in a big city this show takes place in a modern Western setting, and even though modern technology is available it often plays little part in solving the case.

As I mentioned before, characters are usually the most important aspect of a show like this, and Longmire is chock full of good ones, not the least of which is Walt himself.  Old-fashioned and gentlemanly, the stoic and reserved Sheriff Longmire also has something of a darker side, evinced by a series of flashbacks to violent events from his past.  Walt is an imposing presence, not because he’s bombastic and loud but because he’s so quiet and unassuming in spite of his size.  He loves his daughter (even if he keeps her in the dark), Rainier beer and his good friend Henry (a wonderfully understated Lou Diamond Phillips).  Anger seethes under Walt’s skin almost constantly, but in true “old fashioned Cowboy” fashion he doesn’t “deal” with things so much as just carrying on, trudging along and doing his job regardless of what else is happening.

And Walt has plenty of distractions: Branch’s constant attempts to undermine his reputation, Vic (Katee Sackhoff is deliciously sarcastic as a big city cop completely out of her element in the country) gives him grief over being the last man alive not to own a cell phone, and an out-of-town homicide detective (Charles S. Dutton, terrific as ever) is trying to corner Walt and get him to answer some questions about mysterious events Walt may have been involved with in Denver.  But at the end of the day you know Walt will get the job done, even if a little bit more of his already battered and worn-out soul is damaged in the process.

All in all, I find Longmire a thoroughly enjoyable experience.  Groundbreaking?  Not exactly, but I like the way it plays with conventions of the crime drama without being too obvious about it.  The show can at times be quite dark (some of the crimes are gut-wrenching, and not always about murder), and the politics and tension between the Anglo-dominated county and the Cheyenne tribe are well-handled without over-sympathizing or demonizing either side.  All of the characters are nicely rounded (even “The Ferg”, who in spite of being something of a walking cliché still manages to feel believable), and right from the very first episode I felt like I was reconnecting with a bunch of old friends.

So, using Tiffany’s system, I’ll give Longmire a GMacTV rating. Longmire isn’t exactly revolutionary television, but it’s a well-crafted drama which rarely missteps.  It’s also one of the few shows I eagerly anticipate every week (curse you, mere 10-episode season!).

Oh, and who is Robert Taylor?  This Australian born actor has only one major U.S. Credit to his name, and when I learned what that was I had to do a double-take.  Gruff, slow-talking Walt Longmire is none other than Agent Jones from The Matrix.  Whoa.

Agent Jones The Matrix*****

Thank you SO MUCH for taking over this week, Steven.  You are welcome back anytime.

I should probably catch up on Longmire… I do enjoy A&E’s The Glades.

What do you think?  Have you seen Longmire?  If not, do you plan to?  We’d (Steve and I) love to hear from you!

If you haven’t already, be sure to get to know Steven better by reading his blog, liking his Facebook Author Page, and following him on Twitter and Goodreads.

And remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – The Supernatural and Hemlock Grove

We’re doing something a tad different today here at The Ooo Factor… we have our first Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday guest blogger!

Everyone, meet Jenn Alexinas.

Hi, Jenn!
Hi, Jenn!

Jenn, everyone.

I met Jenn at the “Corporate America” company where I worked for ten years.  At first, our relationship was strictly virtual with the occasional phone call.  Then, in 2008, we both relocated to the DFW area for the company.   Without going into too much detail, we knew even before we met in person that we would be lifelong friends.  We both studied English; we both have fair skin and a variation of red hair; we both found ourselves in unique long-term relationships; we both have senses of humor, mine somewhat sarcastic and hers a bit less sarcastic (but she gets me); and somehow, with my being from Texas and her from Ohio, we both have similar values and hobbies, even if I did have to pull her into the world of football.

Anyway, I’ve had a lot on my plate lately, and instead of reblogging an older post today, I asked Jenn to step in.  She loves to write, and is darn good at it, and she has watched a show I do not have access to… a show I’ve been dying to watch—Netflix’s original series, Hemlock Grove.

So now, I hand the keyboard over to Jenn…

*****

Hemlock Grove is Netflix’s newest original series, which, like its predecessor, House of Cards, premiered with all episodes available to watch at once—lending itself easily to a marathon-style-all-in-one-sitting- viewing binge.   I watched the first episode, and immediately found myself intrigued.

If you can get past a few small things, Hemlock Grove is worth a watch.  I’ll admit…the show is not for everyone.  Fans of the standard horror genre might get impatient.  Those who are partial to the ubiquitous supernatural love story might be irked by the lack of melodrama.  Someone who appreciates good acting might turn it off after the first twenty minutes.  And everyone else might just find themselves… confused.  I will say this, though… anyone who feels desensitized to the blood and gore in today’s films and TV shows, and who thinks it impossible to be taken aback by any program’s purported “shock value” may have finally met their match.  At least, I think I did… I mean, I can’t think of the last time I actually breathlessly told a co-worker about how cool a werewolf transformation scene could be.

Looks painful… or maybe he’s just angry?

The story starts with the death of a high school cheerleader in a small industrial steel town. This was a gruesome death, and we aren’t sure if the culprit is human, animal, monster, or something else entirely. However, we quickly learn that while this murder (and subsequent murders) drives the action in the coming episodes, it isn’t really what the story is focused on… if you can claim there is a focus.  We mostly learn all about the town of Hemlock Grove and its denizens, who run the supernatural gamut from gypsies, werewolves, and telepaths, to mad scientists, monsters, and maybe even angels with the ability to impregnate human teenage girls.  Yeah.  There’s a lot going on in this town.

There are some aspects of the show that I really enjoyed.  I’ve gotta say the opening credit sequence is perfectly dark and creepy, with titillating hints of mythology and mysticism.  The aforementioned werewolf transformation scene is just really cool, and extremely graphic in that hope-you-didn’t-just-eat kind of way.  There is certainly some eye candy for the ladies (Landon Liboiron as Peter Rumancek and Bill Skarsgard as Roman Godfrey).  And for the men, there is Famke Janssen, whose sex appeal is enough to make you (almost) overlook her horrendous attempt at a British accent.   My favorite character in the whole show is Shelley (played by Nicole Boivin in close-ups and Michael Andraea in long shots), the “Frankenstein’s Monster” type of creature who is the result of some type of reanimation experiment that is only referred to in two flashback conversations held outdoors in the middle of raucous thunderstorms.  I found the adolescent Shelley, with her disfigured face, bandaged hands and 8 foot frame and inability to utter sounds other than grunts, the only truly likeable character in the series.

Yay!! Eye candy alert… a new Skarsgard!!

In our house, we strategically watched one episode per night, and more than once, that episode left my boyfriend and I looking at each other, open-mouthed, wondering what in the heck just happened.  Sometimes that was because the final scene of the show was so shocking, and other times it was because we really honestly, had no idea what the heck actually had just happened.  As the series progressed, we found ourselves starting each episode with full attention, and then drifting off doing other things, leaving it on in the background.

In keeping with Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday’s tradition, I need to rate this show, and I am awarding it the JFTV rating.  Just like that plate of nachos piled up high with gooey cheese and all the toppings, it’s kind of a mess, really fun to get through, and leaves you knowing you’ll probably go back for seconds, even though you shouldn’t.

*****

Thank you SO MUCH for taking the reins this week, Jenn.  You are welcome back anytime.  I mean it.

And I still want to watch Hemlock Grove…

What do you think?  Have you seen Hemlock Grove?  If not, do you plan to?  We’d (Jenn and I) would love to hear from you!

PS.  Readers, please convince Jenn to come back again sometime… she doesn’t currently blog and I’ve been trying to get her to do a guest post for what feels like forever.

And she may kill me for doing this (it’s better to ask for forgiveness than for permission, right?), but you can follow Jenn on Twitter here.

And remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – CBS Couldn’t Forget About Unforgettable

After two weeks of reviewing new summer TV shows, I’m back to taking a break from the regularly scheduled program.  Sort of.

While I’m not reviewing a new show that has never been seen before, I am showcasing a program that was new to TV in 2012… yet cancelled by CBS last May.

Why?

Because CBS couldn’t forget about Unforgettable.

That’s right… a network actually admitted (in a roundabout way) that they were wrong, or at least hasty, in one of their decisions.  And this doesn’t happen often—ever really—but CBS has officially picked up Unforgettable for a second season after canning it last year.

So, for the sake of today’s Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday post, I’m sharing an older post from 2011, featuring a show that returns to CBS next month with its brand new season.

Unforgettable stars Poppy Montgomery (Without a Trace) as former Syracuse detective Carrie Wells.  Carrie remembers everything:  every moment and every aspect of every day, except for the murder of her sister when she was a child.   When asked to help the New York City police solve a crime that took place outside her apartment that she sort-of witnessed, Carrie is reunited with her ex beau and partner, Detective Al Burns (Dylan Walsh, Nip/Tuck).

After assisting with the one case, Carrie decides to join Al and the NYC force with one major goal—solve her sister’s murder.

The other detectives on the squad (Detective Mike Costello played by Michael Gaston of The Mentalist, and Detective Nina Inara played by Daya Vaidya from Robbery Homicide Division) aren’t quite sure what to think of Carrie; both react as if they think she is weird and don’t appear to want to get to know her on a more personal level.  At first.

But Detective Roe Sanders (Kevin Rankin from Trauma) actually takes an interest in Carrie; he’s amazed with her recall and often times tests her memory, trying to catch her in a slip.  This friendly banter prompts Carrie and Al to open up and share her history and the mystery surrounding her sister’s death with Sanders.

Toward the end of season one, Unforgettable added a TV superstar to the cast – Jane Curtin (Kate & Allie was one of my childhood favorites… and who doesn’t remember Ms. Curtin from SNL back in the day?).  As Dr. Jane Webster, Curtin’s character will supposedly be crucial to Carrie’s ability to solve her sister’s cold case.

Additionally, Marilu Henner (Taxi) consults production.  Similar to the character of Carrie, Henner possesses the rare ability to recall all autobiographical events in real life, a condition known as hyperthymesiaAnd of course, Henner also guest stars in a recurring role as Carrie’s aunt…

Carrie Wells is the ideal detective; especially considering she’s the perfect study subject for a mystery writer as she recalls everything about a crime scene.  Additionally, I absolutely adore Dylan Walsh; while I like Poppy Montgomery (big fan of Without a Trace and love the red hair), I initially watched Unforgettable because of Dr. Sean McNamara (Walsh’s character from Nip/Tuck).

Then there’s the story… with each episode, the writers give viewers not only the fresh case every week, typical of TV’s police procedurals, but also the ongoing serial mystery behind Carrie’s sister’s murder.  However, there is one downfall… the individual cases seemed a bit too predictable for me throughout season one.  I personally don’t like to watch one hour crime dramas only to have the “bad guy” figured out in the first ten or so minutes (my guy likes to call me a TV ninja; I’ve had to learn to keep my opinions to myself while watching police procedurals or I ruin it for him).

But don’t get me wrong; I recorded every new episode and usually watched Poppy and the boys within a week… and I remember thinking it was a shame the show was in danger of cancellation after the season finale last year.  Not to mention, I consider most crime dramas great writing research.  For this, I award the JFTV rating to Unforgettable—no matter the predictability, I’m hooked like a fiend, craving another greasy potato chip.  But, if I’m busy, this is a show that can pile up on the DVR and catch later.

Oh, and guys – this one’s for you: season one really liked to show off Poppy’s amazing arms.  Carrie wears a tank top in almost every episode.  Yea, I’m jealous…

Unforgettable returns July 28th to CBS.

Did you watch Unforgettable?  If not, do you plan to this summer?  Are you as shocked as I am that CBS is bringing a show back after giving it the ax last year?  I’d love to hear from you!

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – From a Straight Up Mess to Prophet… NBC’s Save Me

The summer shows have started, some of them anyway.  And while we still have quite a few to premiere over the next month or so, I did catch a new NBC sitcom that aired two episodes this past week: Save Me.

We’ve heard the stories… someone suffers a near-death experience, prompting a change in his or her outlook on life.  This change is not always a bad thing; sometimes it is absolutely necessary to save one’s soul, but it’s also not always an easy adjustment for those around us and accustomed to our old ways.

This is the premise behind NBC’s Save Me

Save Me follows Beth Harper (Anne Heche, Hung), the matriarch of a run-of-the-mill Midwestern family…. or are they?

After Beth nearly chokes to death on a sandwich, she claims she now has a direct line of communication with God (she’s not very religious, so she usually refers to God as “He/She”).  Obviously, she can’t control when God speaks to her; however, Beth chooses to have her one-on-one time with “He/She” while sitting on the porcelain throne.  Why not, it’s a perfect time to think… right?  Anyway, now believing to be a prophet, she’s set on making right with all those she has wronged and even begins to convince her worst critics that she has changed for the better.

The new sitcom also stars: Michael Landes (Final Destination 2) as Tom, Beth’s philandering husband; Alexandra Breckenridge (American Horror Story) as Carly, one of Tom’s “side projects”; Heather Burns (Miss Congeniality) as Jenna, one of Beth’s neighbors; and Madison Davenport (Shameless) as Emily, Beth’s daughter.

This sitcom really does have a sweet family dynamic.  Despite the fact that Tom is cheating on Beth and their marriage is practically over at the beginning of the show, the two stick together for the sake of their teenage daughter.  He may be unfaithful, but it’s also obvious he loves Beth.  And with her new “trick,” he’s beginning to remember why he fell in love with her in the first place.

And then there’s Beth… man, was she a mess prior to her choking on that hero.  She was no angel, to say the least, but in those few minutes when her heart stopped beating, she found something enlightening and decided to better herself—she wants to save her marriage, she wants to be a better mother (and this relationship could really use some work), and she wants to be a better friend.

By now, you know my rules when it comes to comedy—sitcoms must make me laugh out loud.  I can usually tell after one episode if a thirty-minute show will find a permanent place on my DVR queue; but if not, watching two episodes is definitely enough.  After the two episodes of Save Me, I’m not completely sold… but Anne Heche is very entertaining as Beth.  Plus, the message of the show really is sweet.  Deep down, anyway… some of it is a bit raunchy.

So for now, I’m awarding Save Me with the JFTV rating.  This sitcom is kinda like our favorite bag of potato chips—we know eating one right after the other is not at all good for our health, but the flavor bursts (and the salt) keep us coming back for more.

Did you watch Save Me?  Do you plan to?  I’d love to hear from you!

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

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