Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – AMC’s Fear Fest

October is one of my favorite months.  First of all, football season has officially kicked into high gear.  Also, the cooler weather slowly begins to creep into the state of Texas—everywhere really, but we Texans can finally start to notice a difference between the daytime and nighttime temperatures.

Additionally, one of my favorite holidays just happens to fall during the month of October—Halloween.  I enjoy getting dressed up, most of the time anyway, and handing out candy to all of the children who knock on my door.  I’m also fascinated by the idea of anything spooky—haunted houses, horror movies, etcetera.

I usually dedicate each Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday post to a particular television show.  But not today.  Today, I want to feature an entire channel and its commitment to my favorite time of year—AMC’s Fear Fest.

For almost an entire month (October 13th-31st), AMC airs our favorite horror movie classics.  Everything from:

Alien

Cujo

Child’s Play

Friday the 13th

 A Nightmare on Elm Street

Tremors

The Amityville Horror

The Exorcist

The Omen

And of course, Halloween

Most nights, AMC even plays these movie franchises in order.  Take this week for instance.  Every night this week, we can watch Jason hunt his prey at Camp Crystal Lake.  This weekend, Tremors.  The days before Halloween… you guessed it… the entire Michael Myers collection.

My television is pretty much stuck on AMC’s Fright Fest all day long, every day of the week leading up to Halloween.  It drives my guy crazy.  Not just because he’s not as big on horror flicks as I am, but because I’ve seen all of these films a hundred times over and never tire of watching them.  Oh well, at least he has video games he can go play…

So, if you like the classic horror movies as much as I do, perhaps you’ll want to tune into AMC this month.  As for me, you know where I’ll be.

What’s your favorite classic horror movie?  Are you a fan of AMC’s Fear Fest?  I’d love to hear from you!

Original Vs. Remake: Halloween (1978)

It’s time again for Catie Rhodes and me to break down another cinematic original and its remake.  We’re switching things up this month!  I’m taking on the original… can you believe it?  And next week, Catie will review the remake.  This month we tackle the horror classic, Halloween.  After all, it is October!

Who can get through the Halloween season without watching the spooky 1978 film, Halloween?  Not this horror movie fan!

The House

The Mask

The Scream Queen

Michael Myers

Usually, I open with Catie’s Homemade Summary that applies to both films.  But this time, since I’m going first, I had to draft one all my own:

After escaping from a psychiatric institution where he has been held since childhood, a masked killer returns to his hometown and stalks a babysitter, her friends, and a group of small children, while his doctor hunts him down. 



I can’t begin to explain how excited I am that I’m covering the original horror movie classic this month.  When Catie mentioned that she’d like to review the Rob Zombie 2007 remake, I bounced in my seat and clapped my hands.  Luckily I was alone, except for my animals, so no one saw how silly I looked cheering all by myself.

I absolutely love this movie.  To be honest, it could be John Carpenter’s Halloween that began my love affair with horror movies years and years ago.  I watch it every single Halloween.  Sometimes more than once.  And yes, it drives my guy crazy that I can watch and re-watch the same movie multiple times; he doesn’t share the same love for horror that I do.  But enough about me, let’s get down to business.

By now, I hope we all know the origin of Michael Myers and Halloween, but in case someone doesn’t…

The movie opens with a young Michael Myers stabbing his teenage sister to death in 1963.  He is admitted into Smith’s Grove Sanitarium where he spends the next eighteen years undergoing treatment from psychiatrist Dr. Samuel Loomis.  But, on October 30th 1978, Michael awakens from a catatonic state, escapes the hospital, and steals a car.  Where is he going?  He has unfinished business in Haddonfield, Illinois.

The next morning, we’re introduced to Laurie Strode and her best friends Annie and Linda, a happy group of teenage girls walking to school.  The three friends agree to babysit later that night, Halloween night, despite the fact that Laurie feels like someone has been watching her all day – a man in a dark jumpsuit wearing a weird white mask.

Later that night, Annie’s boyfriend calls her for a ride, so she drops off the little girl she is watching with Laurie who is conveniently babysitting Tommy Doyle across the street.  When Annie is alone in the car, waiting for her boyfriend, Michael sits up from the back seat and kills her.  Tommy watches as the “Boogie Man” carries Annie’s lifeless body back to the house, and tells Laurie, but she shrugs off Tommy’s antics as a Halloween scare.

Next, Michael discovers Linda and her boyfriend, Bob, having sex in the house.  What are the rules of horror movies?  Never have sex.  Have sex and die.

Finally, Michael sets his eyes on his true target – Laurie.  After several very suspenseful scenes, Laurie barely escapes Michael’s grasps and manages to hide the children before crawling deep into a corner of an upstairs closet.  Just as Michael finds her, Dr. Loomis finally catches up to his patient and shoots him.  Michael falls from the bedroom window; however, by the time Loomis looks out, he is gone.

Cue The Music

Ever wonder why the film is referred to as John Carpenter’s Halloween?  That’s because John Carpenter wrote the screenplay (with Debra Hill), produced (with Hill, and others including Moustapha Akkad) and directed the movie, and created the original music.

In October 2010, the Biography Channel aired Halloween: The Inside Story, and my appreciation for the original film of the Halloween franchise grew.  Not only did the film captivate audiences, but the movie’s success came with an extremely low budget, even for the 1970s.

Carpenter took the small financing and hired a ton of no-name actors, including the now famous, Jamie Lee Curtis to play Laurie Strode, Michael’s main target.  He approached famous actors to play the part of Dr. Samuel Loomis, but after multiple rejections, Carpenter finally found an English actor interested in the role, Donald Pleasance.

The other cast members had a few film credits to their name, but many were considered “B” movie actors: Nancy (Loomis) Kyes played Annie; P.J.  Soles starred as Lynda; and Nick Castle played “The Shape” – or Michael Myers as we know him.

Keeping within the small budget, Carpenter selected areas in California for filming the fictional town of Haddonfield, Illinois, and he tasked the actors with gathering and dropping the fake fall leaves over and over again during the twenty-one days of filming.  The most astonishing of all the Halloween facts learned while watching Biography’s special, was the fact that the Michael Myers’ mask is actually a Captain Kirk mask painted and tweaked just a bit so that it wasn’t recognizable as the popular Star Trek character.

Originally titled the The Babysitter Murders, Carpenter’s movie saw extreme box office success. The approximate $300,000 film made over $47 million at the theaters.  The Halloween franchise remains popular today and consists of ten films, including two recent remakes by rocker, Rob Zombie. 

Pleasance and Curtis have remained loyal to the franchise; Pleasance filmed a total of five Halloween films and Curtis four.  The Halloween movies have also featured a few familiar faces over the years:  Danielle Harris (Halloween 4, 5, and both of Rob Zombie’s remakes); Paul Rudd (The Curse of Michael Myers); Josh Hartnett, LL Cool J, Michelle Williams, Jodi Lyn O’Keefe, Adam Arkin, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt (H20); Tyra Banks and Busta Rhymes (Resurrection); and Malcolm McDowell and Scout Taylor Compton (Zombie’s 2007 and 2009 movies).

Halloween III: Season of the Witch is the only film in the franchise that doesn’t tell Michael Myers’ story, and is by far my least favorite.  So which one is my favorite?  The original, of course.  But, I’ll watch  Halloween: The Return of Michael Myers, Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, and Halloween: H20 anytime I can!

What do you think?  Have you seen either the original or the remake of Halloween?  If you’ve seen both, which do you prefer and why?  If you haven’t, do you want to?  I’d love to hear from you! 

Remember to stop by Catie’s blog next week for her take on the Rob Zombie remake.

And at the end of next week, we have a special guest, Jess Witkins, joining the Original vs. Remake fun!  She’s jumping in and covering a third Halloween film.  Which one will she choose?

Tele-Tuesday: Creeping Through the Murder House

Yesterday was Halloween, so in keeping with the previous week’s Tele-Tuesday theme and the spooktacular holiday, we are taking a walk through FX’s new thriller – American Horror Story.

FX does it again with fantastic original programming.  Joining the likes of Nip/Tuck, Damages, and Justified, American Horror Story keeps with the creepy and dark story lines and doesn’t disappoint!

Following a miscarriage and an affair, Vivien and Ben Harmon leave Boston with their daughter looking for a fresh start.  The family buys a gorgeous house, despite learning that the previous owners both died in the basement in an apparent murder-suicide. 

The house is perfect for the Harmons; large enough for Ben (Dylan McDermott, The Practice) to open his private psychiatry practice, and outdated just enough to keep Vivien (Connie Britton, Friday Night Lights) busy redecorating.  At first daughter Violet (Taissa Farmiga) doesn’t understand why the family has to move across the country, but she soon adjusts after she meets her father’s new patient and fellow “cutter” Tate (Evan Peters).    

The family’s new neighbors stop by to introduce themselves: Constance (Academy Award winner, Jessica Lange) and her daughter Adelaide. Constance warns Vivien that Addy has always been attracted to their new home and tends to walk in as she pleases, but fails to disclose that she too has a long history with the house.   

Next, Vivien meets Moira, the house’s former housekeeper.  After briefly visiting with Moira, Vivien decides to hire her to help tend to the house.  But here’s the creepy part – Vivien sees Moira as an older woman (played by Frances Conroy, Six Feet Under), but her adulterous husband sees Moira as a young and sexy maid (played by Alexandra Breckenridge, Dirt).   

Regardless of which version of Moira is on screen, Constance can’t stand her.  Years earlier, young Moira was sleeping with another former owner of the house (played by Eric Close from Without a Trace), a man who Constance loves.  After walking in on Moira and her lover having sex, Constance shoots and kills them both.  Constance doesn’t bother to notice that her boyfriend was forcing himself onto the beautiful housekeeper; instead, she just shoots point-blank into Moira’s eye before taking dead aim at his chest.    

Following a home invasion of crazy people reenacting a previous murder that allegedly took place in her house in the 1960s, Vivien decides to hop on board a tour bus that stops outside her new home to learn a bit of history about the house — The Murder House.

The house was built in the early 1900s by a Dr. Charles Montgomery for his wife, Nora.  Suffering from a down economy, the doctor performs abortions inside the house for extra money.  It’s not long before an angry family member of one of Charles’ patients kidnaps and murders his son.   The events destroy the family, particularly Nora, but when the doctor begins to sew his son back together like a Frankenstein monster, his wife loses it. 

In the 1960s, a group of sorority girls live in the house.  Maria, a devout Christian, answers the door to find a bleeding man on the front porch.  She brings him inside and calls upstairs for the house nurse to help — but it’s a set up.  The man and his friends drown the nurse, and hog tie and brutally murder Maria. 

Vivien has heard enough.  Noticing blood, she jumps off the tour bus and rushes to the doctor afraid she’s suffering another miscarriage.  Her baby is fine, but despite her doctor’s warning to not attempt a move during pregnancy, Vivien insists they sell the house.   

In addition to the legends that Vivien has already heard, the house has an even longer history of death making it difficult for the realtor (Christine Estabrook, Desperate Housewives) to show the house.    

In the 1970s, the house was vacant and set of red-headed twin tweens enjoy vandalizing the property.  Young Adelaide warns the two to not go inside, but they ignore her and continue to break lights and wreak havoc on the house.  After entering the basement, the two boys are murdered. 

Another previous owner, Larry Harvey (Denis O’Hare, True Blood), set the house on fire while his wife and daughters slept.  He too burned, but was spared before perishing himself.  After serving years of his life sentence in prison, he was diagnosed with an advanced stage of brain cancer and was released to live out the remainder of his days a free man. 

Larry begins to stalk Ben and warns him that he must get his family out of that house…

On Halloween 2010, gay lovers Chad (Zachary Quinto, Heroes) and Patrick (Teddy Sears, Raising the Bar) die while preparing to celebrate the festive holiday.  Following a fight, Patrick storms off and a mysterious man dressed in rubber drowns Chad in his apple-bobbing station. 

Attempting to mend fences with his lover, Patrick rushes home wearing his Halloween costume and discovers his partner’s body before suffering his own untimely death at the hands of The Gimp.  As we can see, the previous owners did not die in a murder-suicide, as the realtor tells it, but rather a double homicide.     

Past events continue to unfold, but remember one of the reasons why the family moved away from Boston?  Ben had an affair with his student (Hayden played by Kate Mara from We Are Marshall). 

Hayden announces she is pregnant and shows up at the Harmon house hoping to convince Ben to take care of her or warns she will ruin his marriage.  Crazy Larry takes a shovel to Hayden’s head and Ben covers up the murder by burying her in a grave in the backyard.  As Larry sees it, Ben now owes him; and the house has a new ghost lingering around.

Speaking of the grave, there were other bodies down there: Moira for one.  Constance explains this is why the slain housekeeper is forever tied to the house, especially after Ben builds a gazebo to cover up Hayden’s body.  But are there other bodies down there too? 

All this after just four episodes…    

What do you think?  Have you watched American Horror Story?  Who is The Gimp?  What happened to Tate?  What happened to Constance’s other children, and is she a ghost?  Speaking of Constance, isn’t Jessica Lange magnificent?   What happened to Mrs. Montgomery?  Will Addy be tied to the house along with the other ghosts?  Will the Harmons escape The Murder House?  Who is the father of Vivien’s baby, her husband or the man in the rubber suit?  There are so many questions…I’d love to hear what you think!

Friday FaBOOolousness – The Boo Factor: Halloween

Who can get through the Halloween season without watching the spooky 1978 film, Halloween?  Not this horror movie fan!

The House

The Mask

The Scream Queen

Michael Myers

The movie opens with a young Michael Myers stabbing his teenage sister to death in 1963.  He is admitted into Smith’s Grove Sanitarium where he spends the next eighteen years undergoing treatment from psychiatrist Dr. Samuel Loomis.  But, on October 30th 1978, Michael awakens from his catatonic state, escapes the hospital, and steals a car.  Where’s he going?  He has unfinished business in Haddonfield, Illinois

The next morning, we’re introduced to Laurie Strode and her best friends Annie and Linda, a happy group of teenage girls walking to school.  The three friends agree to babysit later that night, Halloween night, despite the fact that Laurie feels like someone has been watching her all day – a man in a dark jumpsuit wearing a weird, white mask. 

Later that night, Annie’s boyfriend calls for a ride, so she drops off the little girl she is watching with Laurie who is conveniently babysitting Tommy Doyle across the street.  Alone in the car waiting for her boyfriend, Michael sits up from the back seat and kills Annie.  Tommy watches as the “Boogie Man” carries Annie’s lifeless body back to the house, but Laurie shrugs off Tommy’s antics as a Halloween scare. 

Next, Michael discovers Linda and her boyfriend Bob having sex in the house.  What are the rules of horror movies?  Never have sex.  Have sex, and die. 

Michael sets his eyes on his true target – Laurie.  After very suspenseful scenes, Laurie barely escapes Michael’s grasps and manages to hide the children before crawling deep into a corner of an upstairs closet.  Just as Michael finds her, Dr. Loomis finally catches up to his patient and shoots him.  Michael falls from the bedroom window; however by the time Loomis looks out, he is gone. 

Queue The Music

Ever wonder why the film is referred to as John Carpenter’s Halloween?  That’s because John Carpenter wrote the screenplay (with Debra Hill), produced (with Hill, and others including Moustapha Akkad) and directed the movie, and created the original music.

In October 2010, the Biography Channel aired Halloween: The Inside Story, and my appreciation for the original film of the Halloween franchise grew.  Not only did the film captivate audiences, but the movie’s success came with an extremely low budget, even for the 1970s. 

Carpenter took the small financing and hired a ton of no name actors, including the now famous, Jamie Lee Curtis to play Laurie Strode, Michael’s main target.  He approached famous actors to play the part of Dr. Samuel Loomis, but after multiple rejections, Carpenter finally found an English actor interested in the role, Donald Pleasance.

The other cast members had a few film credits to their name, but many were considered “B” movie actors: Nancy (Loomis) Kyes played Annie; P.J.  Soles starred as Lynda; and Nick Castle played “The Shape” – or Michael Myers as we know him.

Keeping within the small budget, Carpenter selected areas in California for filming the fictional town of Haddonfield, Illinois, and he tasked the actors with gathering and dropping the fake fall leaves over and over again during the twenty-one days of filming.  The most astonishing of all the Halloween facts learned while watching Biography’s special, was the fact that the Michael Myers’ mask is actually a Captain Kirk mask painted and tweaked just a bit so that it wasn’t recognizable as the popular Star Trek character.

Originally the The Babysitter Murders, Carpenter’s movie saw extreme box office success. The approximate $300,000 film made over $47 million at the theaters.  The Halloween franchise remains popular today and consists of ten films, including two recent remakes by rocker, Rob Zombie

Pleasance and Curtis have remained loyal to the franchise; Pleasance filmed a total of five Halloween films and Curtis four.  The Halloween movies have also featured a few familiar faces over the years:  Danielle Harris (Halloween 4, 5, and both of Rob Zombie’s remakes); Paul Rudd (The Curse of Michael Myers); Josh Hartnett, LL Cool J, Michelle Williams, Jodi Lyn O’Keefe, Adam Arkin, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt (H20); Sean Patrick Thomas, Tyra Banks, and Busta Rhymes (Resurrection); Malcolm McDowell and Scout Taylor Compton (Zombie’s 2007 and 2009 movies).

Halloween III: Season of the Witch is the only film in the franchise that doesn’t tell Michael Myers’ story, and is by far my least favorite.  So which one is my favorite?  The original, of course.  But, I’ll watch  Halloween: The Return of Michael Myers, Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, and Halloween: H20 anytime I can!

Did the original 1978 Halloween scare you?  Did you ever think twice about babysitting on Halloween?  Which of the Halloween movies is your favorite and least favorite?  Who wins – Michael / Freddie / or Jason?  I’d love to hear from you!

Happy Halloween!

Friday FaBOOolousness – October’s MarvelOoous Halloween Mashup

 

Halloween is right around the corner, so why not dedicate October’s MarvelOoous Mashup to bloggers getting into the spirit with some spooky and festive posts?

We start with one of the most familiar crafts this time of year, pumpkin carving and decorations.  Luckily for us, Angela R. Wallace walks us through some fun ideas in It’s Pumpkin Time!

Keeping with crafts, Tameri Etherton talks about the art of taxidermy (now that’s kind of a creepy conversation for Halloween, right?) and shows off her new front porch skeleton friends in her Wednesday Whimsy post.  Be sure to check out the link she provides to teach all of us how to make our own skeleton buddy.

Kate MacNicol teaches us a bit of Celtic and Wiccan history, as well as provides a healthy soup recipe in her post, What’s Cookin’ in Your Cauldron?

Do people really poison Halloween candy or is it urban legend?  Catie Rhodes investigates and provides some food for thought in her edition of Bad Candy.

Is chocolate really dangerous for our dogs?  Amy Shojai, my pet-guru, offers her expertise in her Howl-oween Spook-tacular and provides helpful first aid tips just in case man’s best friend bites into our chocolate Halloween treats.

Zombies are taking over the world, at least on TV.  Sonia G. Medeiros talks AMC’s The Walking Dead and announces the poll results to best and worst zombie movies ever in The Zombies Have Arrived!

Who can think Halloween without thinking about witches?  Personally, I’m a big fan of witches, which is why when Jess Witkins published A Wicked Review of Gregory Maguire’s Wicked (prequel to The Wizard of Oz), I was wickedly intrigued.

While we’re discussing wicked witches, click over to Jillian Dodd’s Halloween special and tell her which of these sexy warlocks can cast a spell on you in her MANday: Warlocks Edition.

How about some television to get us in the mood for Halloween?  Besides horror, science fiction provides many haunting stories and far-out costume possibilities, as well as keeps the creatures crawling around the screens spooking us.  Not sure what sci-fi to watch?  Check out Amanda Rudd’s series: Top 10 SciFi Television Shows Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

Skeptical that sci-fi and Halloween go hand-in-hand?  Michael Myer’s mask in the Halloween movies was adapted from a Captain Kirk Halloween mask.  No joke.

 

Speaking of haunting TV, who’s watching FX’s new show, American Horror Story?  Creepy….check out Lauralynn Elliot’s thoughts on her blog post of the same name, American Horror Story.

Do you believe in vampires?  They’re fictional, eh?  Read Stacy Green’s post The Vampire of Sacramento and tell me if you change your mind.

Speaking of vampires, visit Jillian Dodd’s blog and vote for which of these hot television and cinematic bad boys with bite can snuggle up and take a nibble out of your neck on her MANday: Vampire Edition.

Finally, it wouldn’t be Halloween without a few hauntings….

Was the home of one of the sexiest men in Hollywood haunted?  Check out Errol Flynn’s Ghost by Catie Rhodes – would you stay the night in Mulholland Farm if the house hadn’t been destroyed?

What are two of the creepiest establishments associated with hauntings?  Insane Asylums and Prisons.  Stacy Green educates us on America’s Most Haunted Prison, and it’s not Alcatraz.

What does Halloween mean to you?  Do you dress up in costume and go trick or treating?  What are some of your favorite Halloween pastimes and crafts?  Do you have any favorite Halloween recipes or ghost stories to share?  I’d love to hear from you!

Come back next week for a Friday FaBOOolousness Boo Factor installment –Halloween.

Friday FabOoolousness – July’s MarvelOoous Mashups and Blog Awards

This month, fellow writer & Twitter friend, Stacy Green awarded me my third blogging award – The Irresistibly Sweet Blog Award.

THANK YOU, Stacy!  Winning this award for my Tele-Tuesday, Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday, and Friday FabOoolousness posts means so very much to me.  I’ve been called a lot of things in my life, and sweet isn’t one of them.  Just kidding!

From now on, anytime someone clicks on the Irresistibly Sweet Blog Award icon on my site, they will experience Stacy’s fabOoolous blog!

I’d also like to thank my great friend, Kathy Owen, for awarding me the Stylish Blogger and Versatile Blogger awards this month.  PLUS, Kathy is the brains behind Amber West’s and my new blog series, The Tamberny AwardsHave you voted?

Kathy writes the best blog series.  Her Monday Masters of Mystery and Fashion Fridays are two of my must see posts each week.  Check them out!

Before I answer the questions associated with The Irresistible Sweet Blog Award, click on these fabOoolous sites in the July edition of MarvelOoous Mashups!

PART I: A Trip Down Memory Lane – the ‘80s and ‘90s

Did anyone keep an old mixed tape? Check out The Lost Art of the Mix Tape by my dear friend, Jenn Alexinas.  What do you think?  Does every mixed tape say something about its maker?

“The Two Coreys” – Corey Feldman and Corey Haim.  What girl didn’t Dream a Little Dream of these two in the ‘80s?  Stacy Green (yep, the one and only from up above) takes us back to the classic film, License to Drive.

It may have all began in the late ‘70s with Halloween, but the ‘80s are often times associated with the birth of many horror films like Friday the 13thSonia Medeiros discusses Who was That Masked Slasher in this Fear Friday Feature.

Not to leave the ‘90s out, Catie Rhodes delves deep into the friendship, character conflict, and theme of Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion in this great post.

PART II: FabOoolous writerly posts

Interested in writing fantasy? Check out these demon names and meanings by Graylin Fox.

Need help with the scenes? Check out Structure of a Scene by my fellow Warrior Writer buddy, Suzan Isik.

How many of us put a book down if the first page doesn’t hook us?  The Bookshelf Muse, aka Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi, offer some First Page Tips.

Guilty of information dumps? Paying too much or not enough attention to setting? Check out 12 Pitfalls to Avoid by Roni Loren.

Want to use artifacts, archaeology, and human history in your writing?  Check out this great example by Gene LemppDystopia Island.

 PART III: Just because they’re fabOoolous

Heard about the new Google+?  Not sure what to think about another social media site?  Check out Amber West’s post.  She says to not be scared….

Deep in the woods, and inside a bloodied bunker, what exactly will we find at Site 27?  I mean, besides dismembered feet.  Vote Your Own Adventure here and support the great Jen Kirchner.

Like choosing the story’s direction?  Then remember Mark Lidstone’s Zombies Vote Your Own Adventure story.  There are zombies everywhere, and our protagonist is cut. How long before the infection sets in?

Love vampires, warlocks, and tons of action? Check out Steven Montano’s flasfiction series, Tales of Blood Earth.  The twelve chapters published on his website make for some fabOoolous reading.  Remember, start from the beginning….

And, now my answers to Stacy’s fun questions associated with the Irresistible Sweet Blog Award.  Enjoy!

If you were a vampire, which celebrity would you first sink your teeth into?  Wow, this is a tough one.

The word vampire immediately makes me think of Damon Salvatore, so I guess that would be Ian Somerhalder. 

What’s you’re middle name? Not your REAL middle name. Your middle name.  I try to keep this blog rated-PG, so let’s go with Brat.  Yep, it’s definitely Brat.

You’re stranded on an island. There’s a monkey with you there, but he’s not too chatty. You also have a ball at your disposal. A ship passes by, but it’s daylight. How will you attract their attention?  My mind immediately goes to streaking….

What are you secretly afraid of? And what are you REALLY afraid of?  I don’t keep many secrets; if I’m afraid of something, everyone around me knows it.  I’m deathly afraid of severe storms (I hide the second I hear the tornado sirens nearby, even if it’s a false alarm; okay, well maybe not on a false alarm, but you catch my drift), sharks (and pretty much anything that swims around in the ocean), scorpions, and things that fly and sting (well, moths too – they fly, but supposedly they don’t sting).

Describe your best friend in five words.  Incredibly intelligent, patient, strong, hero, and love (I’m not counting “incredibly” or “and” as words).

What’s the last movie you watched? Was it good?  Because I’m difficult, I’m breaking this down into two categories:

At the theaterTransformers 3. Great summer entertainment – full of fabOoolous stunts and special effects.  Plus, I actually teared up twice.  What can I say?  I love the bond between Sam and BumbleBee.

From RedboxHall Pass.  We heard really bad things about Owen Wilson and Jason Sudeikis’ film, but we laughed our rears off.  One scene especially caught us so off guard, that I was glad we weren’t eating dinner.  Someone would have spit his food everywhere; I’m just saying.

Who are your favorite fabOoolous bloggers? What are some of your favorite things from the ‘80s and ‘90s? What are you afraid of?  What’s the last movie you’ve seen?  Please share!  I’d love to hear from you!  Happy Friday FabOolousness everyone! 

Friday FaBOOolousness – The “Boo” Factor

Who doesn’t like scary movies?  Jumping in their seats?  Covering their eyes?

 

Growing up in the 1980s, I remember staying up late with my girlfriends and watching Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm Street, and Halloween.  Here we are twenty years later, and we still have late-night watch-a-thons at least once a year and we watch those very same movies.  A few of the sequels lost the original’s “Boo” factor, but that didn’t stop us from catching as many as possible.  Maybe we simply like nostalgia, or maybe we simply love a great scary movie!

 

The scary movie genre fell a bit silent in the early 1990s, but in December of 1996, a new era began with the screenplay magnificence of Kevin Williamson, and the directing brilliance of Wes Craven with Scream.

The intensity of Scream opened immediately with Drew Barrymore’s scene, and continued throughout the entire movie – the piercing ring of the telephone, the horrifying sound of the digitized voice, the mystery behind the long, black cloak, and that creepy mask.

The mask — That Ghostface mask still frightens me to this very day.  I absolutely love Halloween, and opening the door to see all the creative children; but not Ghostface!  I have to force a smile while I hesitantly place yummy candy in Ghostface’s pillow case.  Anyone else notice that?  Ghostface always has a pillow case at Halloween, not a jack-o-lantern — why a pillow case?  What’s in the pillow case?  Would I be so afraid of that pillow case if Ghostface wasn’t so spooky?

What’s another of the most impressive aspects of Scream?  The whodunit mystery — Billy did it!  No, Principal Himbry did it!  No, is Gale doing it?  No, maybe it’s Cotton? It’s Randy!  No, who is the killer?  It’s Billy!  Oh, and Stu?  And, cue the Ah-Ha moment — Brilliant!

Who remembers Randy’s rules?

1) Never have sex

2) Never drink or do drugs

3) Never, ever say “I’ll be right back”

Having watched scary movie after scary movie, I absolutely loved the obvious, satirical, slap-in-the-face cliché moments in Scream.  Combining the terror of the anticipation of Ghostface with the laugh-out-loud comedy, Scream left its mark in movie FaBOOolousness.

Sequels usually don’t carry the same power as the originals; however, Scream 2 sure didn’t fail Scream in terms of the whodunitmystery.  It’s definitely not Billy & Stu….or is it?  Is it Gale?  No, is it Randy?  No, it’s Derek.  Nope!  It is…. and Scream 3, the only installment not written by Kevin Williamson, took a different approach.  While it wasn’t nearly as successful with the whodunitmystery, I still had the killer pegged wrong.

Scream paved the way for scary movies, and luckily, today the scary movie industry is still going strong.  Now, here’s to you, Scream 4:  Sidney’s back, Dewey’s back, and Gale’s back.  I can’t wait!  We’re going Saturday…are you?

What’s your favorite scary movie & why?  I’d love to hear from you!