Original Vs. Remake: Halloween (1978)

It’s time again for Catie Rhodes and me to break down another cinematic original and its remake.  We’re switching things up this month!  I’m taking on the original… can you believe it?  And next week, Catie will review the remake.  This month we tackle the horror classic, Halloween.  After all, it is October!

Who can get through the Halloween season without watching the spooky 1978 film, Halloween?  Not this horror movie fan!

The House

The Mask

The Scream Queen

Michael Myers

Usually, I open with Catie’s Homemade Summary that applies to both films.  But this time, since I’m going first, I had to draft one all my own:

After escaping from a psychiatric institution where he has been held since childhood, a masked killer returns to his hometown and stalks a babysitter, her friends, and a group of small children, while his doctor hunts him down. 



I can’t begin to explain how excited I am that I’m covering the original horror movie classic this month.  When Catie mentioned that she’d like to review the Rob Zombie 2007 remake, I bounced in my seat and clapped my hands.  Luckily I was alone, except for my animals, so no one saw how silly I looked cheering all by myself.

I absolutely love this movie.  To be honest, it could be John Carpenter’s Halloween that began my love affair with horror movies years and years ago.  I watch it every single Halloween.  Sometimes more than once.  And yes, it drives my guy crazy that I can watch and re-watch the same movie multiple times; he doesn’t share the same love for horror that I do.  But enough about me, let’s get down to business.

By now, I hope we all know the origin of Michael Myers and Halloween, but in case someone doesn’t…

The movie opens with a young Michael Myers stabbing his teenage sister to death in 1963.  He is admitted into Smith’s Grove Sanitarium where he spends the next eighteen years undergoing treatment from psychiatrist Dr. Samuel Loomis.  But, on October 30th 1978, Michael awakens from a catatonic state, escapes the hospital, and steals a car.  Where is he going?  He has unfinished business in Haddonfield, Illinois.

The next morning, we’re introduced to Laurie Strode and her best friends Annie and Linda, a happy group of teenage girls walking to school.  The three friends agree to babysit later that night, Halloween night, despite the fact that Laurie feels like someone has been watching her all day – a man in a dark jumpsuit wearing a weird white mask.

Later that night, Annie’s boyfriend calls her for a ride, so she drops off the little girl she is watching with Laurie who is conveniently babysitting Tommy Doyle across the street.  When Annie is alone in the car, waiting for her boyfriend, Michael sits up from the back seat and kills her.  Tommy watches as the “Boogie Man” carries Annie’s lifeless body back to the house, and tells Laurie, but she shrugs off Tommy’s antics as a Halloween scare.

Next, Michael discovers Linda and her boyfriend, Bob, having sex in the house.  What are the rules of horror movies?  Never have sex.  Have sex and die.

Finally, Michael sets his eyes on his true target – Laurie.  After several very suspenseful scenes, Laurie barely escapes Michael’s grasps and manages to hide the children before crawling deep into a corner of an upstairs closet.  Just as Michael finds her, Dr. Loomis finally catches up to his patient and shoots him.  Michael falls from the bedroom window; however, by the time Loomis looks out, he is gone.

Cue The Music

Ever wonder why the film is referred to as John Carpenter’s Halloween?  That’s because John Carpenter wrote the screenplay (with Debra Hill), produced (with Hill, and others including Moustapha Akkad) and directed the movie, and created the original music.

In October 2010, the Biography Channel aired Halloween: The Inside Story, and my appreciation for the original film of the Halloween franchise grew.  Not only did the film captivate audiences, but the movie’s success came with an extremely low budget, even for the 1970s.

Carpenter took the small financing and hired a ton of no-name actors, including the now famous, Jamie Lee Curtis to play Laurie Strode, Michael’s main target.  He approached famous actors to play the part of Dr. Samuel Loomis, but after multiple rejections, Carpenter finally found an English actor interested in the role, Donald Pleasance.

The other cast members had a few film credits to their name, but many were considered “B” movie actors: Nancy (Loomis) Kyes played Annie; P.J.  Soles starred as Lynda; and Nick Castle played “The Shape” – or Michael Myers as we know him.

Keeping within the small budget, Carpenter selected areas in California for filming the fictional town of Haddonfield, Illinois, and he tasked the actors with gathering and dropping the fake fall leaves over and over again during the twenty-one days of filming.  The most astonishing of all the Halloween facts learned while watching Biography’s special, was the fact that the Michael Myers’ mask is actually a Captain Kirk mask painted and tweaked just a bit so that it wasn’t recognizable as the popular Star Trek character.

Originally titled the The Babysitter Murders, Carpenter’s movie saw extreme box office success. The approximate $300,000 film made over $47 million at the theaters.  The Halloween franchise remains popular today and consists of ten films, including two recent remakes by rocker, Rob Zombie. 

Pleasance and Curtis have remained loyal to the franchise; Pleasance filmed a total of five Halloween films and Curtis four.  The Halloween movies have also featured a few familiar faces over the years:  Danielle Harris (Halloween 4, 5, and both of Rob Zombie’s remakes); Paul Rudd (The Curse of Michael Myers); Josh Hartnett, LL Cool J, Michelle Williams, Jodi Lyn O’Keefe, Adam Arkin, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt (H20); Tyra Banks and Busta Rhymes (Resurrection); and Malcolm McDowell and Scout Taylor Compton (Zombie’s 2007 and 2009 movies).

Halloween III: Season of the Witch is the only film in the franchise that doesn’t tell Michael Myers’ story, and is by far my least favorite.  So which one is my favorite?  The original, of course.  But, I’ll watch  Halloween: The Return of Michael Myers, Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, and Halloween: H20 anytime I can!

What do you think?  Have you seen either the original or the remake of Halloween?  If you’ve seen both, which do you prefer and why?  If you haven’t, do you want to?  I’d love to hear from you! 

Remember to stop by Catie’s blog next week for her take on the Rob Zombie remake.

And at the end of next week, we have a special guest, Jess Witkins, joining the Original vs. Remake fun!  She’s jumping in and covering a third Halloween film.  Which one will she choose?

Friday FaBOOolousness – The Boo Factor: Halloween

Who can get through the Halloween season without watching the spooky 1978 film, Halloween?  Not this horror movie fan!

The House

The Mask

The Scream Queen

Michael Myers

The movie opens with a young Michael Myers stabbing his teenage sister to death in 1963.  He is admitted into Smith’s Grove Sanitarium where he spends the next eighteen years undergoing treatment from psychiatrist Dr. Samuel Loomis.  But, on October 30th 1978, Michael awakens from his catatonic state, escapes the hospital, and steals a car.  Where’s he going?  He has unfinished business in Haddonfield, Illinois

The next morning, we’re introduced to Laurie Strode and her best friends Annie and Linda, a happy group of teenage girls walking to school.  The three friends agree to babysit later that night, Halloween night, despite the fact that Laurie feels like someone has been watching her all day – a man in a dark jumpsuit wearing a weird, white mask. 

Later that night, Annie’s boyfriend calls for a ride, so she drops off the little girl she is watching with Laurie who is conveniently babysitting Tommy Doyle across the street.  Alone in the car waiting for her boyfriend, Michael sits up from the back seat and kills Annie.  Tommy watches as the “Boogie Man” carries Annie’s lifeless body back to the house, but Laurie shrugs off Tommy’s antics as a Halloween scare. 

Next, Michael discovers Linda and her boyfriend Bob having sex in the house.  What are the rules of horror movies?  Never have sex.  Have sex, and die. 

Michael sets his eyes on his true target – Laurie.  After very suspenseful scenes, Laurie barely escapes Michael’s grasps and manages to hide the children before crawling deep into a corner of an upstairs closet.  Just as Michael finds her, Dr. Loomis finally catches up to his patient and shoots him.  Michael falls from the bedroom window; however by the time Loomis looks out, he is gone. 

Queue The Music

Ever wonder why the film is referred to as John Carpenter’s Halloween?  That’s because John Carpenter wrote the screenplay (with Debra Hill), produced (with Hill, and others including Moustapha Akkad) and directed the movie, and created the original music.

In October 2010, the Biography Channel aired Halloween: The Inside Story, and my appreciation for the original film of the Halloween franchise grew.  Not only did the film captivate audiences, but the movie’s success came with an extremely low budget, even for the 1970s. 

Carpenter took the small financing and hired a ton of no name actors, including the now famous, Jamie Lee Curtis to play Laurie Strode, Michael’s main target.  He approached famous actors to play the part of Dr. Samuel Loomis, but after multiple rejections, Carpenter finally found an English actor interested in the role, Donald Pleasance.

The other cast members had a few film credits to their name, but many were considered “B” movie actors: Nancy (Loomis) Kyes played Annie; P.J.  Soles starred as Lynda; and Nick Castle played “The Shape” – or Michael Myers as we know him.

Keeping within the small budget, Carpenter selected areas in California for filming the fictional town of Haddonfield, Illinois, and he tasked the actors with gathering and dropping the fake fall leaves over and over again during the twenty-one days of filming.  The most astonishing of all the Halloween facts learned while watching Biography’s special, was the fact that the Michael Myers’ mask is actually a Captain Kirk mask painted and tweaked just a bit so that it wasn’t recognizable as the popular Star Trek character.

Originally the The Babysitter Murders, Carpenter’s movie saw extreme box office success. The approximate $300,000 film made over $47 million at the theaters.  The Halloween franchise remains popular today and consists of ten films, including two recent remakes by rocker, Rob Zombie

Pleasance and Curtis have remained loyal to the franchise; Pleasance filmed a total of five Halloween films and Curtis four.  The Halloween movies have also featured a few familiar faces over the years:  Danielle Harris (Halloween 4, 5, and both of Rob Zombie’s remakes); Paul Rudd (The Curse of Michael Myers); Josh Hartnett, LL Cool J, Michelle Williams, Jodi Lyn O’Keefe, Adam Arkin, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt (H20); Sean Patrick Thomas, Tyra Banks, and Busta Rhymes (Resurrection); Malcolm McDowell and Scout Taylor Compton (Zombie’s 2007 and 2009 movies).

Halloween III: Season of the Witch is the only film in the franchise that doesn’t tell Michael Myers’ story, and is by far my least favorite.  So which one is my favorite?  The original, of course.  But, I’ll watch  Halloween: The Return of Michael Myers, Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, and Halloween: H20 anytime I can!

Did the original 1978 Halloween scare you?  Did you ever think twice about babysitting on Halloween?  Which of the Halloween movies is your favorite and least favorite?  Who wins – Michael / Freddie / or Jason?  I’d love to hear from you!

Happy Halloween!

Friday FaBOOolousness – October’s MarvelOoous Halloween Mashup

 

Halloween is right around the corner, so why not dedicate October’s MarvelOoous Mashup to bloggers getting into the spirit with some spooky and festive posts?

We start with one of the most familiar crafts this time of year, pumpkin carving and decorations.  Luckily for us, Angela R. Wallace walks us through some fun ideas in It’s Pumpkin Time!

Keeping with crafts, Tameri Etherton talks about the art of taxidermy (now that’s kind of a creepy conversation for Halloween, right?) and shows off her new front porch skeleton friends in her Wednesday Whimsy post.  Be sure to check out the link she provides to teach all of us how to make our own skeleton buddy.

Kate MacNicol teaches us a bit of Celtic and Wiccan history, as well as provides a healthy soup recipe in her post, What’s Cookin’ in Your Cauldron?

Do people really poison Halloween candy or is it urban legend?  Catie Rhodes investigates and provides some food for thought in her edition of Bad Candy.

Is chocolate really dangerous for our dogs?  Amy Shojai, my pet-guru, offers her expertise in her Howl-oween Spook-tacular and provides helpful first aid tips just in case man’s best friend bites into our chocolate Halloween treats.

Zombies are taking over the world, at least on TV.  Sonia G. Medeiros talks AMC’s The Walking Dead and announces the poll results to best and worst zombie movies ever in The Zombies Have Arrived!

Who can think Halloween without thinking about witches?  Personally, I’m a big fan of witches, which is why when Jess Witkins published A Wicked Review of Gregory Maguire’s Wicked (prequel to The Wizard of Oz), I was wickedly intrigued.

While we’re discussing wicked witches, click over to Jillian Dodd’s Halloween special and tell her which of these sexy warlocks can cast a spell on you in her MANday: Warlocks Edition.

How about some television to get us in the mood for Halloween?  Besides horror, science fiction provides many haunting stories and far-out costume possibilities, as well as keeps the creatures crawling around the screens spooking us.  Not sure what sci-fi to watch?  Check out Amanda Rudd’s series: Top 10 SciFi Television Shows Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

Skeptical that sci-fi and Halloween go hand-in-hand?  Michael Myer’s mask in the Halloween movies was adapted from a Captain Kirk Halloween mask.  No joke.

 

Speaking of haunting TV, who’s watching FX’s new show, American Horror Story?  Creepy….check out Lauralynn Elliot’s thoughts on her blog post of the same name, American Horror Story.

Do you believe in vampires?  They’re fictional, eh?  Read Stacy Green’s post The Vampire of Sacramento and tell me if you change your mind.

Speaking of vampires, visit Jillian Dodd’s blog and vote for which of these hot television and cinematic bad boys with bite can snuggle up and take a nibble out of your neck on her MANday: Vampire Edition.

Finally, it wouldn’t be Halloween without a few hauntings….

Was the home of one of the sexiest men in Hollywood haunted?  Check out Errol Flynn’s Ghost by Catie Rhodes – would you stay the night in Mulholland Farm if the house hadn’t been destroyed?

What are two of the creepiest establishments associated with hauntings?  Insane Asylums and Prisons.  Stacy Green educates us on America’s Most Haunted Prison, and it’s not Alcatraz.

What does Halloween mean to you?  Do you dress up in costume and go trick or treating?  What are some of your favorite Halloween pastimes and crafts?  Do you have any favorite Halloween recipes or ghost stories to share?  I’d love to hear from you!

Come back next week for a Friday FaBOOolousness Boo Factor installment –Halloween.

Friday FaBOOolousness – The “Boo” Factor: When Death Decides

How many of us are paranoid about something?  We all are, right?

Do movies help or hurt with our paranoia?

I shudder to think about spiders (thanks, Arachnophobia!), scorpions (thanks, Clash of the Titans!), snakes (thanks, Snakes on a Plane!), sharks (thanks, Jaws!), and severe storms (thanks, Twister!).  I could keep going, but you catch my drift. 

But, does paranoia stop us from watching these scary movies?

Usually not!  Most of us have babysat and been alone in the dark of someone else’s living room and pictured Michael Myers, right?  Or gone to bed and prayed Freddy is really only a fictional character? Or maybe we’ve gone camping near water and crossed our fingers that Jason is tied tightly and cemented to the bottom of the lake, right? 

What do we do when Death decides it’s our time?

If the question alone isn’t enough, the Final Destination franchise doesn’t help the paranoia, at all! 

It all started in 2000 with the release of Final Destination and the curse of Flight 180.  Alex (Devon Sawa, Nikita), Clear (Ali Larter, Varsity Blues & Heroes), and their classmates gather at the airport for their senior trip.  But before take-off, Alex has a premonition that they’re all going to die.  Pandemonium breaks out and Alex and Clear, along with a few of their friends, are booted off the flight.  Guess what?  Alex’s vision saves their lives; the plane explodes and everyone left on board dies. 

Matters continue to worsen when Alex’s friends start to die in freak accidents – in the order of their original seat number on the doomed flight!  One accidentally hangs himself in the shower; another is splattered by a moving bus; one is stabbed by a kitchen knife (that’s right, no one was controlling the knife; it did it all on its own); one is decapitated at the scene of a train wreck; and one is pummeled by a neon sign. 

To add to the paranoia, in 2003, Final Destination 2 hit the movie theaters.  Kim (A.J. Cook from Criminal Minds) envisions a massive wreck on the highway she and her friends are about to pull onto so she stalls her vehicle.  Crisis averted, right? Nope! Not minutes later, an 18-wheeler causes an accident.  Kim, as well as a few of her friends, survive the crash, including Officer Burke (Matthew Landes, Special Unit 2) who would have died had it not been for Kim’s actions.       

Knowing the past mysterious deaths of the survivors of Flight 180, Kim and Officer Burke visit Clear in the mental hospital, but Clear only warns there is nothing they can do to escape Death.  And, guess what?  One by one the survivors of the wreck die in freakish accidents.  One can always count on at least one character death by impalement, decapitation, explosion, or by being crushed by some object.   One of the deaths that grabbed our attention in FD2 followed a car crash when an emergency worker accidentally set off the airbag trying to remove a survivor from the wreckage, knocking her head into one of the metal pipes thrown through her car from a truck involved in the accident — brutal!

 

The fun doesn’t stop there!  In 2006, Final Destination 3 introduced cinema-goers to a new crowd of unlucky teenagers.  Wendy (Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World), Kevin (Ryan Merriman, Pretty Little Liars), and friends board the roller coaster at a local theme park.  What happens next? Wendy has a premonition; some get off the doomed ride; and, the rest fall to their death.

Kevin tells Wendy about the others and warns that everyone that managed to escape the roller coaster will start to die.  And?  They do!  The death scene in FD3 that still haunts me to this day is when two girls get trapped and roast to death inside a couple of tanning beds –talk about a case of vanity kills! 

The Final Destination was released in 2009, and thinking this was the last installment in the series, I was sure not to miss it!  Nick (Bobby Campo), his girlfriend Lori (Shantel VanSanten, One Tree Hill), and their best friends, Janet and Hunt, are attending a Nascar-like event where Nick envisions debris on the track causing a wreck, that leads to mass chaos, and eventually explosions killing nearly everyone in the crowd.   

Like clockwork, one by one the survivors die in even more crazy accidents.  The climatic tension surrounding the hot mom’s (Krista Allen) impending death was pretty great.  Will she get chopped up by the loose ceiling fan?  Will the hair dresser accidentally stab her with her scissors?  Or will she escape?  Well, we know that’s not going to happen.  Instead, she dies when a flying rock rips through her eye after being tossed by a lawn mower across the street.  I normally wouldn’t mention the almost situations, but TFD filmed one potential death scene that really freaked me out when Janet’s sun-roof opened and malfunctioned inside a drive-thru car wash.  She managed to escape, but the thought of what that would feel like is haunting.   

Everyone dies in The Final Destination, another reason why one might think this movie wrapped up the franchise.  But, guess what? 

Final Destination 5 in 3D hits theaters this August!

What do you think now: Do movies help or hurt with our paranoia?

Which of the Final Destination movies do you like best? Because of these movies, do you think twice now when flying? Do you fall farther behind or drive past the trucks hauling metal pipes? Do you check the tanning bed to make sure you can open it once inside? Do you watch a roller coaster and envision something horrible happening?  Will you take your car through a drive-thru car wash and stare at your sun-roof the entire time?  Do you avoid walking under large, dangling signs or cranes lifting large objects? What makes you paranoid?  Will you see Final Destination 5?  I’d love to hear from you!