Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – The End of Warehouse 13

Last week, one of my favorite SyFy series returned for its final season. I like it when I network actually lets a show’s creators know in advance that the series is set to end, giving them a chance to wrap everything up nicely with a big red bow. So, for the sake of today’s Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday post, I’m revisiting an older post from 2011, featuring Warehouse 13. And I’m asking you—how will it end?

Throughout history, government agencies have built secret warehouses around the world to house and protect magical artifacts.  These warehouses are overseen by the Secret Service and a group known as the Council of Regents.

Warehouse 13, the current warehouse designed by a team including Thomas Edison, is hidden deep in the mountains outside of the fictional town of Univille, South Dakota, also known as the middle of nowhere.  As a part of their cover, the Secret Service agents claim to work for the IRS, and therefore the townsfolk snub them.  After all, who likes the IRS?

Dr. Arthur “Artie” Nielsen (Saul Rubinek) is the agent-in-charge of the warehouse.  Artie has a hard time trusting others with the artifacts, and he is oftentimes frustrated with his two lead agents, Myka and Pete.  Artie isn’t very personable, although he does have an ongoing crush on a visiting doctor played by Lindsay Wagner, who comes once a year to remove his regenerating appendix (it’s a magical show, remember?).

Viewers learn that Artie’s mysterious past includes his unknowingly trading magical artifacts to the Soviet Union in exchange for the release of his imprisoned family members, an act that was considered treason by the United States.  Once he turned himself in, the US government assigned him to the warehouse where he has been ever since.

Myka Bering (Joanne Kelly) is the traditional, play by the rules, Secret Service agent working at the warehouse.  Like most women, Myka pays great attention to detail, and her professional style clashes with her goofy partner, Pete.  On a personal note, Myka has a pet ferret (that she named Pete) and she loves Twizzlers. A girl after my own heart…

What “special power” does Myka bring to the table? She has a photographic memory.

Pete Lattimer (Eddie McClintock) is the other side of the partnership.  He’s a former Marine and a recovering alcoholic, yet he still has a goofy and fun side.  Pete loves sports, collects comic books, and craves junk food.

What “special power” does Pete bring to the table? He’s a master at reading lips and he can sense when something bad is about to happen.

The two partners share a cute relationship—it’s clear that they love each other, but more in a brotherly/sisterly kind of way.  Pete dated the town veterinarian for a little while (until an artifact possessed her and she tried to kill him), while Myka managed to kiss the boy she crushed on in high school at her reunion.  Other than that, the Warehouse 13 agents rarely have time for any romantic interludes.

The Warehouse also employs Claudia (Allison Scagliotti), a young techie-genius who went to work for the team after breaking into the warehouse… or at least we’re led to believe that was the first Artie and the Board of Regents had hears about Claudia, until recently, that is.

A few other recurring characters include: Mrs. Frederic (C.C.H. Pounder), the director of the warehouse and liaison between the agents and regents; Helena “H.G.” Wells (Jaime Murray), an agent from the late 1800’s, who bounces back and forth between good and evil; and, Steve Jinks (Aaron Ashmore), an agent brought in after Myka temporarily resigned.

A huge bonus to working at the warehouse is the access to very cool gadgets.  The agents communicate with one another visually and telephonically via a “Farnsworth” in lieu of cell phones.  Instead of using real guns, the agents fire a “Tesla Gun”—a weapon that shoots lightning bolts and stuns the bad guys instead of killing them.  The agents also use caution when in public by capturing the magic of the artifacts by sealing them inside metallic “flash” bags.

Warehouse 13 has featured many historical artifacts throughout the seasons, including: Lewis Carroll’s looking glass, Lizzie Borden’s compact, Marilyn Monroe’s hair brush, Harry Houdini’s wallet, Marie Antoinette’s guillotine blade (well, the one that killed her), Ben Franklin’s lightning rod, and Edgar Allan Poe’s quill pen.

Not personally big on most shows featured on SyFy, I find Warehouse 13 very enjoyable.  I read somewhere that W13 has over 50% female viewers, maybe for the very same reasons that I watch—it’s fun, magical, and an escape from reality.  That’s why Warehouse 13 earns the JFTV rating… it’s like the bag of potato chips that we just can’t put down.

Are you a Warehouse 13 fan? Is there an artifact throughout history that you’d like to get your hands on? And if so, what magical power do you think it might possess?  

Better yet, how do you think the series will end? I’d love to hear from you!

*****

Tiffany A. White is the author of the YA mystery Football Sweetheart series available on Kindle and Nook.  She is available for contact via Twitter, Facebook, Google+, or via email at tiffany {at} tiffanyawhite {dot} com.

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – Warehouse 13 and its Magical Artifacts

I know I mentioned last week that I would review Starz’s Da Vinci’s Demons today, but I’m taking a break from the regularly scheduled program.  I know… I’ve been doing that a lot lately.  Let’s blame it on Spring Fever.  That, and trying to push out my Football Sweetheart paperbacks and book two in the series.

So, for the sake of today’s Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday post, I’m sharing an older post from 2011, featuring a show that just recently returned to SyFy with its new season—Warehouse 13.

Throughout history, government agencies have built secret warehouses around the world to house and protect magical artifacts.  These warehouses are overseen by the Secret Service and a group known as the Council of Regents.

Warehouse 13, the current warehouse designed by a team including Thomas Edison, is hidden deep in the mountains outside of the fictional town of Univille, South Dakota, also known as the middle of nowhere.  As a part of their cover, the Secret Service agents claim to work for the IRS, and therefore the townsfolk snub them.  After all, who likes the IRS?

Dr. Arthur “Artie” Nielsen (Saul Rubinek) is the agent-in-charge of the warehouse.  Artie has a hard time trusting others with the artifacts, and he is oftentimes frustrated with his two lead agents, Myka and Pete.  Artie isn’t very personable, although he does have an ongoing crush on a visiting doctor played by Lindsay Wagner, who comes once a year to remove his regenerating appendix (it’s a magical show, remember?).

Viewers learn that Artie’s mysterious past includes his unknowingly trading magical artifacts to the Soviet Union in exchange for the release of his imprisoned family members, an act that was considered treason by the United States.  Once he turned himself in, the US government assigned him to the warehouse where he has been ever since.

Myka Bering (Joanne Kelly) is the traditional, play by the rules, Secret Service agent working at the warehouse.  Like most women, Myka pays great attention to detail, and her professional style clashes with her goofy partner, Pete.  On a personal note, Myka has a pet ferret (that she named Pete) and she loves Twizzlers.

What “special power” does Myka bring to the table? She has a photographic memory.

Pete Lattimer (Eddie McClintock) is the other side of the partnership.  He’s a former Marine and a recovering alcoholic, yet he still has a goofy and fun side.  Pete loves sports, collects comic books, and craves junk food.

What “special power” does Pete bring to the table? He’s a master at reading lips and he can sense when something bad is about to happen.

The two partners share a cute relationship—it’s clear that they love each other, but more in a brotherly/sisterly kind of way.  Pete dated the town veterinarian for a little while (until an artifact possessed her and she tried to kill him), while Myka managed to kiss the boy she crushed on in high school at her reunion.  Other than that, the Warehouse 13 agents rarely have time for any romantic interludes.

The Warehouse also employs Claudia (Allison Scagliotti), a young techie-genius who went to work for the team after breaking into the warehouse…

A few other recurring characters include: Mrs. Frederic (C.C.H. Pounder), the director of the warehouse and liaison between the agents and regents; Helena “H.G.” Wells (Jaime Murray), an agent from the late 1800’s, who bounces back and forth between good and evil; and, Steve Jinks (Aaron Ashmore), an agent brought in after Myka temporarily resigned.

A huge bonus to working at the warehouse is the access to very cool gadgets.  The agents communicate with one another visually and telephonically via a “Farnsworth” in lieu of cell phones.  Instead of using real guns, the agents fire a “Tesla Gun”—a weapon that shoots lightning bolts and stuns the bad guys instead of killing them.  The agents also use caution when in public by capturing the magic of the artifacts by sealing them inside metallic “flash” bags.

Warehouse 13 has featured many historical artifacts throughout the seasons including Lewis Carroll’s looking glass, Lizzie Borden’s compact, Marilyn Monroe’s hair brush, Harry Houdini’s wallet, Marie Antoinette’s guillotine blade (well, the one that killed her), Ben Franklin’s lightning rod, and Edgar Allan Poe’s quill pen.

Not personally big on most shows featured on SyFy, I find Warehouse 13 very enjoyable.  I read somewhere that W13 has over 50% female viewers, maybe for the very same reasons that I watch—it’s fun, magical, and an escape from reality.  That’s why Warehouse 13 earns the JFTV rating… it’s like the bag of potato chips that we just can’t put down.

Are you a Warehouse 13 fan? Is there an artifact throughout history that you’d like to get your hands on, and if so, what magical power do you think it might possess?   I’d love to hear from you!

Come back next week when I return to the regularly scheduled program and review Starz’s Da Vinci’s Demons.

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – Defending Defiance

This week on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday, I’m taking a look at the new SyFy series, Defiance

Earth as we now know it is gone.

After an alien invasion in 2013, the humans and the aliens fought for years (“The Pale Wars”), destroying much of the planet.  But now, thirty-three years later, and following the destruction of the aliens’ solar system (Votanis), the humans and the seven different species of Votans are trying to co-exist.

The story follows Joshua Nolan (Grand Bowler, Ugly Betty) and his adopted alien daughter, Irisa (Stephanie Leonidas)—a member of the Irathient species—as they search for a better place to live.  While searching for alien spacecraft items they can sell for money, the father/daughter duo runs into trouble and finds assistance from a group of strangers.  These strangers lead Nolan and Irisa to a familiar city, only recognizable by the remnants of its once beautiful city landmark…  St. Louis is no more—now they call it Defiance.

Nolan and his alien daughter, Irisa

Defiance also stars: Julie Benz (Dexter) as Amanda Rosewater, Mayor of Defiance; Tony Curran (Being Human) as Datak Tarr, a member of the Castithan species; Jaime Murray (Warehouse 13) as Stahma Tarr, Datak’s Castithan wife; Mia Kirshner (24) as Kenya Rosewater, Amanda’s sister and owner of the local bar; Graham Green (Dances with Wolves) as Rafe McCawley, a mine owner; and Fionnula Flanagan (Lost) as Nicky Riordon, the former Defiance mayor and Amanda’s mentor.

Since Defiance is a TV show about aliens, let’s get to know the seven species of Votans: the Irathient – a near human, nature-loving, and deeply spiritual and peaceful species, with a skin color of almost bronze;  the Castithan – very similar to humans, with yellow eyes and a skin tone near albinism, who hail from an alien caste society—high and low, with most of the lower caste destroyed along with the Votanis solar system; the Indogene – a technically advanced species with white skin and no hair follicles; the Sensoth – aliens who are covered in fur and are taller than humans, similar to the orangutan; the Gulanee – a mysterious species, even to the other Votan; the Volge – the villain species; and the Mutants, which is pretty self-explanatory.

Datak and Stahma Tarr, Castithans

Will Nolan and the other citizens of Defiance (aliens included) protect their city?  Or will the world’s evil destroy what’s left?

I’ve watched three hours of Defiance (the two-hour premiere and the second week’s episode).  To be honest, the series does not hold my attention.  My guy on the other hand likes it and he wants me to remember that fantasy series like this need to spend some time worldbuilding.  I know this, but then I think about TNT’s Falling Skies, I remember it didn’t bore me immediately off the bat; Falling Skies didn’t spend the first three hours or so worldbuilding… it jumped right into the action.  Yes; there has already been at least one great Volge (the “bad” aliens) versus Defiance (humans and “good” aliens) battle, but for me to watch science fiction TV, I need a bit more up front to hook me.

For that, I’m awarding SyFy’s Defiance with the NIV rating.  I’ll watch at it if my guy has it on the living room TV and there’s no escaping it, but I’d prefer he watch it while I’m falling asleep in bed and not paying much attention anyway.  Maybe I’ll change my mind later… because I know I will get stuck watching more episodes because my guy really does like it, but for now I’m sticking with the NIV.

What do you think?  Have you watched Defiance?  I’d love to hear from you! 

Come back next week when I take on another new show… Starz’s Da Vinci’s Demons.

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss today’s review, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday – Continuing with Continuum

We have some changes coming to Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday… but for now, those can wait.  Today, Amber West and I are going back to our old ways and we’re covering two different shows—she’s reviewing ITV’s mystery, Broadchurch, and I’m taking on SyFy’s newest drama, Continuum.

I love the supernatural; however, I’m not that big on science fiction television… not like my guy, anyway.  He has watched everything on the SyFy network, from Battlestar Gallactica to Caprica, and all the Stargate series.  Wanting to spend some quality TV time with him, I have jumped in and checked out a few of the shows on his favorite channel.  And I have found a few of the more recent programs, like Warehouse 13, Haven, and Being Human very enjoyable.

Last year, SyFy began airing Lost Girl, a TV series already primed for season two in Canada.  The network started the episodes from the beginning and ran them consecutively so US audiences were all caught up.  I loved it—watching Lost Girl every week for almost twenty weeks was like an extended season of supernatural greatness.

And now the network is at it again… only this time, it’s with the SyFy UK hit and Canadian series Continuum.  As this show prepares for season two in Canada, the American audience gets to first catch up.

So, in true Tiffany fashion, I decided to give it a try…

This science fiction program follows a group of convicted terrorists, or rebels (known as Liber8), from the year 2077 back in time to 2012.  Just as the gang was scheduled for execution in 2077, they somehow mastered time travel and jumped through a portal.  Inadvertently following them is Officer Kiera Cameron (Rachel Nichols from Criminal Minds), who takes it upon herself to prevent this group from altering events in the past and hopes to return them to their time.

Will Kiera control the past to save the future?

As one would expect, the technology in 2077 is far more advanced than we’re accustomed to in 2012.  In the future, Kiera and the other police officers wear special uniforms—suits that enable them to research, analyze data, and track criminals once they are “tagged” with trackers… kind of like a computer.  But technology isn’t the only difference between their time and our time; small things have changed too, and games such as Rock-Paper-Scissors don’t exist anymore.

Lost in this new world, Kiera attempts to make contact with her control station via her communications system, but instead connects with a teen (Alec Sadler, played by Erik Knudsen from Jericho) working out of his family’s barn.  This boy happens to be the one responsible for inventing the technology she and the police use in 2077, and he begins serving her as her guide and confidant in 2012.

While still tracking Liber8, Kiera finds she must do something to fit in with the current times.  So after helping a local detective (Carlos Fonnegra, played by Victor Webster from Charmed and Mutant X) solve a case, she accepts a position with the Vancouver police as a member of a terrorist task force—after all, the VPD believes she’s a federal agent and sees no harm in extending this offer to her.

The series also stars: Tony Amendola (Once Upon a Time) as Edouard, the leader of the Liber8 rebels; Roger Cross (24) as Travis, another Liber8 member who takes charge until Edouard arrives; Lexa Doig (Andromeda) as Sonja, one of the female Liber8 members; and Stephen Lobo (Falcon Beach and Smallville) as Matthew, a former Liber8 member, who, after having a falling out with his fellow rebels, decides to help Kiera in 2012.

Like I mentioned earlier, I’m not all that big on science fiction programs; however, I have managed to watch the first six episodes of SyFy’s latest series with my guy (who really likes it, by the way).  And while I still don’t think Continuum is the best show on SyFy, it’s not bad; therefore, I’ll award the Canadian hit with the JFTV rating.  When there’s nothing else to watch, I’ll continue with the series… kind of like when I am searching for something to satisfy my late-night cravings and a bag of greasy potato chips is all I can find in the pantry.

But if anyone was to ask my guy, he’d probably give it a MacTV rating.

What do you think?  Have you watched Continuum?  I’d love to hear from you! 

Now click over to Amber’s blog and see what she thinks about the ITV mystery she just so happened upon this last week…

Come back next week when we share some big news… and maybe review something too.

Remember to stop by the #watchwed hashtag in Twitter to discuss any of today’s reviews, or to mention any television programs that you’d like to see on Why It’s Worth a Watch Wednesday in the future.

A Recap of The WatchWed Review System:

GTV (Gourmet TV): Everything we want and more
MacTV (MacNCheese TV): Guilty pleasure. Not perfect, but is satisfies
GMacTV (Gourmet MacNCheese TV): A combination of fine wine and comfort food
JFTV (Junk food TV):It’s not great for us, but we’ll go back for seconds
TBPTV (Twice Baked Potato TV): Part gourmet and delicious, while absolutely horrible for our cholesterol
SSTV (Still Simmering TV): It has potential, but the jury is still out
NIV (NyQuil Induced Viewing): Perfect for that late night television sleep timer
LOTV (Liver&Onions TV): Do we really have to explain? Blech
Inedible TV: Exactly how it sounds…

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